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제 삼과 -- 제 3 과 -- Unit Three
소개 -- An Introduction

Mr. Park takes a moment to formally introduce himself to you, and to tell you about his American friend, Mr. Smith. Play Video

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안녕하세요? 처음 뵙겠습니다.1 처음 뵙겠습니다.
Even though you have SEEN Mr. Park in Unit Two, you're only now getting to meet him "personally." Hence the greeting "I'm pleased to meet you."
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제 이름은 박인호예요.2 제 이름은 박인호예요.
Literally, "As for my name, (it) is Inho Park."
This is an alternative way of introducing oneself, similar in use to 저는 박인호에요, "I am Inho Park."
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반갑습니다.
저는 대학교 영어교수3 대학교 영어교수
Taken together, these words mean "college(-level) English professor." Like English, Korean can form compound words by joining two words:

>대학 'college' + 교수 'professor' = 대학 교수 'college professor'
>한국 'Korea' + 사람 'person' = 한국 사람 'Korean (person)'
>일본 'Japan' + 말 'speech' = 일본 말 'Japanese (language)'
>한국 'Korea' + 말 'speech' + 선생 'teacher'
= 한국말 선생 'Korean teacher'

Note that the word 대학교 itself is a compound form:
대 = 'large, big, great' + 학교 = 'school'
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예요.
이 분은 제 친구4 친구
The concept of "friend" in Korean culture differs somewhat from that in much of the Western world. Korean "friends" are more likely than not to be of the same age (that is born during the same lunar year) and of the same sex. Casual acquaintances (especially those of a different age or status), co-workers, and even fellow school-mates of different years are not likely to earn the title 친구. Given that Mr. Park introduces Mr. Smith as his "friend," we are led to infer that they have spent time together--in this case, it is most likely that the two studied together and were part of the same academic class.
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예요.이름은 데이비드 스미스5 데이비드 스미스
Note that David Smith's name is given in its Western order: given name first, family name second. Note, too, that his name is rendered in Hangul as closely as Korean allows. For example, there is no [v] sound in Korean, so the "vi" in "David" appears as a "비" in Korean, which is pronounced as [bi]; the "th" of "Smith" is rendered in Korean as an [s] sound with " ㅅ." Note, too, that when used in a Korean-langauge context, Western names should be pronounced according to * Korean * norms, not English/Western norms. Thus "David Smith" in Korean should be pronounced something along the lines of [de-i-bi-du su-mi-su].

By the way: If you don't have a Korean-based name, you will need to decide how to spell--and pronounce--your name in Korean. Conferring with a native speaker of the language is very useful in this regard.
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예요.
스미스선생님은 한국 6
Note Mr. Park's use of the honorific word 분; he's indicating
respect for Mr. Smith's rank as a professor.
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이 아니에요.
미국 분이에요.
스미스선생님은 한국말을 잘 7
The word 못 is prefixed to verbs and carries the meaning "can not."
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해요.
그러나 영어는 아주 잘 해요.
저도 영어를 조금 해요.
그러나 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요8 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요
At this stage, you should learn this phrase as an idiomatic unit. The grammatical ins-and-outs of such a construction will be discussed as we progress further into our study of Korean.
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Dialogue Play Video

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Mr. Park and Mr. Smith enter the room and encounter Ms. Kim.
Mr. Park: 김선생님,안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 김선생님,이 분은 데이비드 스미스9 데이비드 스미스
Note again that David Smith's name is given in its * Western * order:
Given - Family.
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선생님
이에요10 이에요
You might be noticing how this word seems to "spill into" this
line from the line above. In Korean, if a word doesn't fit on
a given line, it is conventional to simply continue it on the
next, without hyphens, dashes, etc.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

Ms. Kim: 처음 뵙겠습니다.11 처음 뵙겠습니다.
When being introduced to somebody in Korea, it is typical to offer a friendly handshake accompanied by a modest bow from the waist. In bowing, aim to angle your body from about 30 degrees from vertical. The key here is moderation: don't squeeze your hand too tightly nor bow too deeply.
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저는 김수미예요.
Mr. Smith: 처음 뵙겠습니다 처음 뵙겠습니다
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.반갑습니다.
Ms. Kim: 어,한국말 잘 하시네요12 하시네요
In this sentence, the verbal ending -네요 as in 하시네요 is used to
indicate wonder or admiration: Mr. Smith really *does* speak Korean well!
As we shall see, Korean uses a range of verbal endings to indicate emotion
or attitude. The difficult lies in attempting to translate such expressions
directly into English. It's often the case that one can't do so.
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Mr. Smith: 아니오,잘 못해요.13 아니오,잘 못해요.
Note that Mr. Smith's response to Ms. Kim's compliment ("You speak Korean well") is to politely refuse it ("No, I don't..."). To say "thank you" to such a compliment in Korean would be seen as inappropriate or impolite.
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Ms. Kim: 미국 분이세요?
Mr. Smith: 네,미국 사람14 사람
Note that when referring to himself as an American person, Mr. Smith uses the plain/non-honorific word 사람 [saram], whereas in the preceding question, Ms. Kim has used the honorific term 분 [pun].
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이에요.
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님은 대학교수 대학교수
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예요.
영어교수예요.
Ms. Kim: 그래요? 저도 선생이에요.
Mr. Smith: 영어 선생님이세요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오,한국말 선생이에요.
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님 한국말 잘 하시지오?15 하시지오?
This verb form, 하시지오,is different from those that we've seen up until now. The use of the verb suffix -지오 adds an extra dimension to the utterance, a dimension similar to a "tag question" in English:
한국말을 잘 하시지오? "He speaks Korean well, doesn't he?"
In this sense, -지오 invites the listener to agree with the speaker. For
lack of better translation, 하시지오 is rendered as "speaks, eh?" in the English word audio.

Compare the form in -지오 with its -요 counterparts:
한국말을 잘하세요. "He speaks Korean well."
한국말을 잘하세요? "Does he speak Korean well?"
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Ms. Kim: 네!아주 잘 하세요!
Mr. Smith: 아니오,한국말 잘 못해요.
Mr. Park: 김선생님,영어 잘 하시지오16 하시지오
Verbs ending in -지오 can also be found with a variant spelling: -지요.
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Ms. Kim: 아니오,조금 해요.
박선생님이 영어 잘 하시지오17 하시지오
In this case, 하시지오 is used more like a statement. The
addition of the -지오 ending gives it the sense of being
more emphatic or convincing.
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Mr. Smith: 네,아주 잘 하세요.
Mr. Park: 아니에요,아직도 많이 배워야 돼요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?18 --> What have you learned in this unit?
1. A review of introducing yourself.
2. How to introduce somebody else.
3. How to discuss your language abilities.
4. How to give and receive a compliment.
5. How to use the verb ending -지오 to form a tag question or
to provide additional emphasis.

Remember: Korean has a wide variety of verb endings that encode
a range of information: politeness, honorific, emotion, attitude,
etc. These endings are often not directly translatable.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

--> How can you further develop your skills?19 --> How can you further develop your skills?
- Try to form groups of three in which each person can introduce another.
- Write a short letter to a Korean friend using the utterances you've learned thus far.
- Make a list of people you know and for each record his/her:
> name
> nationality
> occupation
> languages they can speak
> whether they speak each language well or not
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.20 --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
We learn best that which we find most useful and most relevant. As such, you should take it upon yourself to supplement the vocabularly found in these lessons by learning a few extra words that are important to YOU. If you need to learn a word not found in units 1-3, look them up in a Korean-English dictionary. (Purchase one if you can; it will prove to be very useful.) Keep a notebook of your own personally-chosen vocabulary items.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

Additional lessons: occupations occupations
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

 

▲ Hide Footnotes

  1. 처음 뵙겠습니다.

    Even though you have SEEN Mr. Park in Unit Two, you're only now getting to meet him "personally." Hence the greeting "I'm pleased to meet you."

  2. 제 이름은 박인호예요.

    Literally, "As for my name, (it) is Inho Park."
    This is an alternative way of introducing oneself, similar in use to 저는 박인호에요, "I am Inho Park."

  3. 대학교 영어교수

    Taken together, these words mean "college(-level) English professor." Like English, Korean can form compound words by joining two words:

    >대학 'college' + 교수 'professor' = 대학 교수 'college professor'
    >한국 'Korea' + 사람 'person' = 한국 사람 'Korean (person)'
    >일본 'Japan' + 말 'speech' = 일본 말 'Japanese (language)'
    >한국 'Korea' + 말 'speech' + 선생 'teacher'
    = 한국말 선생 'Korean teacher'

    Note that the word 대학교 itself is a compound form:
    대 = 'large, big, great' + 학교 = 'school'

  4. 친구

    The concept of "friend" in Korean culture differs somewhat from that in much of the Western world. Korean "friends" are more likely than not to be of the same age (that is born during the same lunar year) and of the same sex. Casual acquaintances (especially those of a different age or status), co-workers, and even fellow school-mates of different years are not likely to earn the title 친구. Given that Mr. Park introduces Mr. Smith as his "friend," we are led to infer that they have spent time together--in this case, it is most likely that the two studied together and were part of the same academic class.

  5. 데이비드 스미스

    Note that David Smith's name is given in its Western order: given name first, family name second. Note, too, that his name is rendered in Hangul as closely as Korean allows. For example, there is no [v] sound in Korean, so the "vi" in "David" appears as a "비" in Korean, which is pronounced as [bi]; the "th" of "Smith" is rendered in Korean as an [s] sound with " ㅅ." Note, too, that when used in a Korean-langauge context, Western names should be pronounced according to * Korean * norms, not English/Western norms. Thus "David Smith" in Korean should be pronounced something along the lines of [de-i-bi-du su-mi-su].

    By the way: If you don't have a Korean-based name, you will need to decide how to spell--and pronounce--your name in Korean. Conferring with a native speaker of the language is very useful in this regard.

  6. Note Mr. Park's use of the honorific word 분; he's indicating
    respect for Mr. Smith's rank as a professor.

  7. The word 못 is prefixed to verbs and carries the meaning "can not."

  8. 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요

    At this stage, you should learn this phrase as an idiomatic unit. The grammatical ins-and-outs of such a construction will be discussed as we progress further into our study of Korean.

  9. 데이비드 스미스

    Note again that David Smith's name is given in its * Western * order:
    Given - Family.

  10. 이에요

    You might be noticing how this word seems to "spill into" this
    line from the line above. In Korean, if a word doesn't fit on
    a given line, it is conventional to simply continue it on the
    next, without hyphens, dashes, etc.

  11. 처음 뵙겠습니다.

    When being introduced to somebody in Korea, it is typical to offer a friendly handshake accompanied by a modest bow from the waist. In bowing, aim to angle your body from about 30 degrees from vertical. The key here is moderation: don't squeeze your hand too tightly nor bow too deeply.

  12. 처음 뵙겠습니다

  13. 하시네요

    In this sentence, the verbal ending -네요 as in 하시네요 is used to
    indicate wonder or admiration: Mr. Smith really *does* speak Korean well!
    As we shall see, Korean uses a range of verbal endings to indicate emotion
    or attitude. The difficult lies in attempting to translate such expressions
    directly into English. It's often the case that one can't do so.

  14. 아니오,잘 못해요.

    Note that Mr. Smith's response to Ms. Kim's compliment ("You speak Korean well") is to politely refuse it ("No, I don't..."). To say "thank you" to such a compliment in Korean would be seen as inappropriate or impolite.

  15. 사람

    Note that when referring to himself as an American person, Mr. Smith uses the plain/non-honorific word 사람 [saram], whereas in the preceding question, Ms. Kim has used the honorific term 분 [pun].

  16. 하시지오?

    This verb form, 하시지오,is different from those that we've seen up until now. The use of the verb suffix -지오 adds an extra dimension to the utterance, a dimension similar to a "tag question" in English:
    한국말을 잘 하시지오? "He speaks Korean well, doesn't he?"
    In this sense, -지오 invites the listener to agree with the speaker. For
    lack of better translation, 하시지오 is rendered as "speaks, eh?" in the English word audio.

    Compare the form in -지오 with its -요 counterparts:
    한국말을 잘하세요. "He speaks Korean well."
    한국말을 잘하세요? "Does he speak Korean well?"

  17. 하시지오

    Verbs ending in -지오 can also be found with a variant spelling: -지요.

  18. 하시지오

    In this case, 하시지오 is used more like a statement. The
    addition of the -지오 ending gives it the sense of being
    more emphatic or convincing.

  19. --> What have you learned in this unit?

    1. A review of introducing yourself.
    2. How to introduce somebody else.
    3. How to discuss your language abilities.
    4. How to give and receive a compliment.
    5. How to use the verb ending -지오 to form a tag question or
    to provide additional emphasis.

    Remember: Korean has a wide variety of verb endings that encode
    a range of information: politeness, honorific, emotion, attitude,
    etc. These endings are often not directly translatable.

  20. --> How can you further develop your skills?

    - Try to form groups of three in which each person can introduce another.
    - Write a short letter to a Korean friend using the utterances you've learned thus far.
    - Make a list of people you know and for each record his/her:
    > name
    > nationality
    > occupation
    > languages they can speak
    > whether they speak each language well or not

  21. --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.

    We learn best that which we find most useful and most relevant. As such, you should take it upon yourself to supplement the vocabularly found in these lessons by learning a few extra words that are important to YOU. If you need to learn a word not found in units 1-3, look them up in a Korean-English dictionary. (Purchase one if you can; it will prove to be very useful.) Keep a notebook of your own personally-chosen vocabulary items.

Close video window

Close video window

Korean: Word View, click below to listen
제 삼과 -- 제 3 과 -- Unit Three
소개 -- An Introduction

Mr. Park takes a moment to formally introduce himself to you, and to tell you about his American friend, Mr. Smith. Play Video

안녕하세요처음 뵙겠습니다
이름은 박인호예요반갑습니다
저는 대학교 영어교수예요
분은 친구예요이름은 데이비드 스미스예요
스미스선생님은 한국 분이 아니에요
미국 분이에요
스미스선생님은 한국말을 해요
그러나 영어는 아주 해요
저도 영어를 조금 해요
그러나 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요

Dialogue Play Video

Mr. Park and Mr. Smith enter the room and encounter Ms. Kim.
Mr. Park: 김선생님안녕하세요
Ms. Kim: 안녕하세요
Mr. Park: 김선생님 분은 데이비드 스미스선생님 이에요
Ms. Kim: 처음 뵙겠습니다저는 김수미예요
Mr. Smith: 처음 뵙겠습니다반갑습니다
Ms. Kim: 어,한국말 하시네요
Mr. Smith: 아니오 해요
Ms. Kim: 미국 분이세요
Mr. Smith: 미국 사람이에요
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님은 대학교수예요
영어교수예요
Ms. Kim: 그래요저도 선생이에요
Mr. Smith: 영어 선생님이세요
Ms. Kim: 아니오한국말 선생이에요
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님 한국말 하시지오
Ms. Kim: 아주 하세요
Mr. Smith: 아니오한국말 못해요
Mr. Park: 김선생님영어 하시지오
Ms. Kim: 아니오조금 해요
박선생님이 영어 하시지오
Mr. Smith: 아주 하세요
Mr. Park: 아니에요아직도 많이 배워야 돼요

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: occupations


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Korean: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 삼과 -- 제 3 과 -- Unit Three
소개 -- An Introduction

Mr. Park takes a moment to formally introduce himself to you, and to tell you about his American friend, Mr. Smith. Play Video

안녕하세요? 처음 뵙겠습니다.
제 이름은 박인호예요. 반갑습니다.
저는 대학교 영어교수예요.
이 분은 제 친구예요.이름은 데이비드 스미스예요.
스미스선생님은 한국 분이 아니에요.
미국 분이에요.
스미스선생님은 한국말을 잘 못해요.
그러나 영어는 아주 잘 해요
저도 영어를 조금 해요.
그러나 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요.

Dialogue Play Video

Mr. Park and Mr. Smith enter the room and encounter Ms. Kim.
Mr. Park: 김선생님,안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 김선생님,이 분은 데이비드 스미스선생님 이에요.
Ms. Kim: 처음 뵙겠습니다.저는 김수미예요.
Mr. Smith: 처음 뵙겠습니다.반갑습니다.
Ms. Kim: 어,한국말 잘 하시네요
Mr. Smith: 아니오,잘 못해요.
Ms. Kim: 미국 분이세요?
Mr. Smith: 네,미국 사람이에요.
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님은 대학교수예요.
영어교수예요.
Ms. Kim: 그래요? 저도 선생이에요.
Mr. Smith: 영어 선생님이세요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오,한국말 선생이에요.
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님 한국말 잘 하시지오?
Ms. Kim: 네!아주 잘 하세요!
Mr. Smith: 아니오,한국말 잘 못해요.
Mr. Park: 김선생님,영어 잘 하시지오?
Ms. Kim: 아니오,조금 해요.
박선생님이 영어 잘 하시지오.
Mr. Smith: 네,아주 잘 하세요.
Mr. Park: 아니에요,아직도 많이 배워야 돼요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: occupations


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
제 삼과 -- 제 3 과 -- Unit Three
소개 -- An Introduction

Mr. Park takes a moment to formally introduce himself to you, and to tell you about his American friend, Mr. Smith. Play Video

안녕하세요처음 뵙겠습니다
이름은 박인호예요반갑습니다
저는 대학교 영어교수예요
분은 친구예요이름은 데이비드 스미스예요
스미스선생님은 한국 분이 아니에요
미국 분이에요
스미스선생님은 한국말을 해요
그러나 영어는 아주 해요
저도 영어를 조금 해요
그러나 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요

Dialogue Play Video

Mr. Park and Mr. Smith enter the room and encounter Ms. Kim.
Mr. Park: 김선생님안녕하세요
Ms. Kim: 안녕하세요
Mr. Park: 김선생님 분은 데이비드 스미스선생님 이에요
Ms. Kim: 처음 뵙겠습니다저는 김수미예요
Mr. Smith: 처음 뵙겠습니다반갑습니다
Ms. Kim: 어,한국말 하시네요
Mr. Smith: 아니오 해요
Ms. Kim: 미국 분이세요
Mr. Smith: 미국 사람이에요
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님은 대학교수예요
영어교수예요
Ms. Kim: 그래요저도 선생이에요
Mr. Smith: 영어 선생님이세요
Ms. Kim: 아니오한국말 선생이에요
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님 한국말 하시지오
Ms. Kim: 아주 하세요
Mr. Smith: 아니오한국말 못해요
Mr. Park: 김선생님영어 하시지오
Ms. Kim: 아니오조금 해요
박선생님이 영어 하시지오
Mr. Smith: 아주 하세요
Mr. Park: 아니에요아직도 많이 배워야 돼요

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: occupations


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 삼과 -- 제 3 과 -- Unit Three
소개 -- An Introduction

Mr. Park takes a moment to formally introduce himself to you, and to tell you about his American friend, Mr. Smith. Play Video

안녕하세요? 처음 뵙겠습니다.
제 이름은 박인호예요. 반갑습니다.
저는 대학교 영어교수예요.
이 분은 제 친구예요.이름은 데이비드 스미스예요.
스미스선생님은 한국 분이 아니에요.
미국 분이에요.
스미스선생님은 한국말을 잘 못해요.
그러나 영어는 아주 잘 해요
저도 영어를 조금 해요.
그러나 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요.

Dialogue Play Video

Mr. Park and Mr. Smith enter the room and encounter Ms. Kim.
Mr. Park: 김선생님,안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 김선생님,이 분은 데이비드 스미스선생님 이에요.
Ms. Kim: 처음 뵙겠습니다.저는 김수미예요.
Mr. Smith: 처음 뵙겠습니다.반갑습니다.
Ms. Kim: 어,한국말 잘 하시네요
Mr. Smith: 아니오,잘 못해요.
Ms. Kim: 미국 분이세요?
Mr. Smith: 네,미국 사람이에요.
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님은 대학교수예요.
영어교수예요.
Ms. Kim: 그래요? 저도 선생이에요.
Mr. Smith: 영어 선생님이세요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오,한국말 선생이에요.
Mr. Park: 스미스선생님 한국말 잘 하시지오?
Ms. Kim: 네!아주 잘 하세요!
Mr. Smith: 아니오,한국말 잘 못해요.
Mr. Park: 김선생님,영어 잘 하시지오?
Ms. Kim: 아니오,조금 해요.
박선생님이 영어 잘 하시지오.
Mr. Smith: 네,아주 잘 하세요.
Mr. Park: 아니에요,아직도 많이 배워야 돼요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: occupations


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com