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제 이과 -- 제 2 과 -- Unit Two
안녕하세요? -- Hello Play Video

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Meet Ms. Sumi Kim, one of your two Korean teachers!
안녕하세요?
처음 뵙겠습니다.1 처음 뵙겠습니다.
A reasonably formal way to acknowledge the fact that you are meeting somebody for the first time. In Korean culture, there is great importance attached to introductions, particularly first-time introductions. It is uncommon that two individuals will significantly interact with one another unless they have been formally introduced. In the context of today's lesson, Ms. Kim has taken it upon herself to introduce herself to you, the student.
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저는2 저는
This word is composed of two parts: 저 and 는.
저 is a Korean noun meaning "I"; it is a polite, humble form.
-는 is a particle that is used to mark the topic of the sentence.
Taken together, "저는" means "as for me..."

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김 수미3 김 수미
Note that in Korea, family names precede given names. Thus "Sumi Kim" introduces herself in Korean as "Kim Sumi." When addressing and referring to non-Asians, the practice of placing the family name first is typically relaxed, and the Western order of "First-Last" is observed.
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예요4 예요
This is the verb "to be" when used as an "equals" sign. Note that in Korean, the verb appears at the END of the sentence; as such the entire sentence can be translated word-for-word as:
"As for me, Kim Sumi am."
When the noun before the verb ends in a consonant, the form "-이에요" is used; when the noun before the verb ends in a vowel, the form "-예요" is used.

In Korean, this verb is joined directly to the preceding noun (with no spaces in between) to form a single word. In various parts of this lesson, the verbal element -이에요/-예요 has been marked off as a separate word (as distinct from its adjoined noun) only so that you can see the details of this grammatical construction.
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한국 사람5 한국 사람
The item 한국사람 is composed of two parts:
한국 is the word meaning "Korea (the country)" and
사람 is a neutral (non-honorific) term meaning "person"
Note that in the People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea), the word 조선 "Chosun" is used in place of 한국.
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이에요6 이에요
Notice that this sentence -- 한국 사람이에요 -- has no overt topic or subject. It could be translated as simply "Is a Korean person." In Korean, when the topic is clear from context, it is often left out. In this case, Sumi is talking about herself, as as such, does need to begin each sentence with "As for me."
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저는 학생이7 학생이
The item 학생이 is composed of two parts:
학생 is a noun meaning 'student.'
-이 is a particle that marks the subject of a sentence.
When the noun before the subject marker ends with a consonant, the subject marker takes the form "이." When the nown before the subject marker ends with a vowel, the subject marker takes the form "가."

The difference between the topic marker (는/은) and the subject marker (이/가) is often difficult to master at first. A reasonable strategy to be begin with is this:
X+topic = "As for X, ..."
X+subject = "An X" or "The X"

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아니에요.8 아니에요.
The item 아니에요 -- meaning "is not" -- is the opposite of the verbal element -이에요 / -예요.

When using 아니에요, the general formula is to establish a TOPIC and then use a SUBJECT to say what the topic is not. For example:
>> X는 Y가 아니에요 = "(As for) X, (it) is not (a) Y."
>> 수미는 학생이 아니에요 = "Sumi is not a student."


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선생이에요.
한국말9 한국말
Alongside this form, 한국말 "han-gung-mal" you may also encounter the phrase 한국어 pronounced "han-gug-uh"; both mean "Korean language." Even though both words carry the same general meaning--"language"--for some speakers, the form 말 is less educated or sophisticated
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선생이에요.

Ms. Kim would like you to meet Mr. Park, your other Korean teacher.
10
분 is the honorific counterpart to 사람. 분 is used in cases where the speaker wishes to show respect toward the person being spoken to or about.
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박인호 선생님11 박인호 선생님
In this case, the phrase "선생(님)" does not mean "teacher" but rather is a form of address that shows respect, somewhat along the lines of "Mr." or "Ms." or "Mrs." As a term of address, -선생 can be used with either men or women. The addition of the particle -님 makes it clear that the speaker is showing the referent respect.

Note the order of elements: Last.Name + First.Name + Title.
When using 선생님 as a title, first name is optional:
박 선생님 = "Mr./Ms. Park"
박 인호선생님 = "Mr. Inho Park"
김 수미선생님 = "Ms. Sumi Kim"
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이에요.
박선생님12
-도 is a particle that attaches to nouns to mean "also" or "too." Note that it must be attached to a noun; unlike English "also/too," -도 can NEVER be used at the very end of a sentence.
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한국 한국
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사람이에요.
그러나13 그러나
Unlike English "however" -- which may appear at the beginning or end of sentence -- the Korean word 그러나 must always appear at the beginning of a sentence.
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한국말 선생님이 아니에요.14 한국말 선생님이 아니에요.
Note that this sentence with 아니에요 "not be" has no overt topic. The "missing" topic is understood to be Mr. Park (박선생님은 "As for Mr. Park...").
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영어 선생님이에요.
박선생님은 남자예요.
그러나 저는 남자가 아니에요15 남자가 아니에요
From a "realism" perspective, this utterance is a strange thing for Ms. Kim to say. The phrase does, however, serve an educational purpose. On the one hand, it reinforces the use of the negative pattern ("X is not...").
Moreover, it may prove useful for a non-Korean speaking student, particularly when assessing the gender of names. Foe non-Koreans, it is difficult to know if a given name belongs to a woman or a man. Hence you might ask, "Is so-and-so a woman?" and receive back a response of the sort you see here: "No, not woman, a man."
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여자예요.

Dialogue Play Video

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Ms. Kim enters the room where Mr. Park is working and says:
Ms. Kim: 박선생님,안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 네.김선생님,안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.요즘 바쁘세요?16 바쁘세요?
In this context, 바쁘세요?means "are you busy?"
The element "-세-" within the verb is an HONORIFIC marker. It indicates that the speaker is showing respect for the adressee.

It is very important to note that in the next line of the dialogue, Mr. Park replies using the verb 바빠요. Note here that the verb form is slightly different. Most noticeable is the absence of the -세- element. When speaking about oneself, one does NOT use an honorific form, but rather a plain form of the verb.
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Mr. Park: 네,바빠요.김선생님도 바쁘세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,바빠요.박선생님, 그것이 무엇이에요?17 그것이 무엇이에요?
This phrase has been given here in rather formal, written style. In spoken Korean, it is likely to be contracted as follows: 그게 뭐예요?
It is important to recognize both forms, the contracted *and* the uncontracted, more formal (or "literate").
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Mr. Park: 이것은 책이에요.18 이것은 책이에요.
This sentence could be literally translated as follows:
"As for this thing, is-a-book."
Here we find:
1. a topic: 이 것은 'as for this thing'
2. no subject
3. a verb: 책이에요 'is a book'
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Ms. Kim: 한국말19 한국말
Alternative form: 한국어. In this case, "어" means "language," and is derived from Chinese. "말" also means "speech/language" but is a native Korean word.
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이에요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 영어책이에요.
김선생님,20
"그" is a demonstrative adjective meaning "that" (near you, the listener). Compare 그 with its counterparts:
이 "this" (near me, the speaker) and
저 "that/yonder" (away from both speaker and listener).
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것이 무엇이에요?
Ms. Kim: 이것은 신문이에요.
Mr. Park: 영어 신문이에요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오. 일본21 일본
일본 is the word meaning "Japan." It is composed of two parts: 일 meaning "sun" and 본 meaning "source, root" -- in other words, "Land of the Rising Sun."
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말 신문이에요.
저... 약속이 있는데요...22 약속이 있는데요...
This is polite way to bring a conversation to a close, provided that you have something you need to do. At this stage in your career as a Korean learner, knowing the exact grammatical structure of this sentence is far LESS important than knowing how to pronounce it and when to use it!
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그럼,안녕히 계세요.
Mr. Park: 네,안녕히 가세요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?23 --> What have you learned in this unit?
1. How to introduce yourself.
2. How to identify people and objects using the verb -이에요/-예요.
3. How to ask for identifying information using 무엇 "what."
4. Demonstrative adjectives meaning "this," "that," and "yon."
5. The names of countries and common objects -- see supplemental lessons.
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--> How can you further develop your skills?24 --> How can you further develop your skills?
- Practice introducing yourself to Korean friends.
- Practice asking about and identifying common objects.
- Learn to identify countries on a globe or map.
- Try to BUILD conversations based not only on the materials
covered here in Unit 2, but also on the phrases you've memorized
from Unit 1. (You haven't forgotten them already, have you?)
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

Direct links to additional lessons: countries countries
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson
objects objects
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We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

 

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  1. 처음 뵙겠습니다.

    A reasonably formal way to acknowledge the fact that you are meeting somebody for the first time. In Korean culture, there is great importance attached to introductions, particularly first-time introductions. It is uncommon that two individuals will significantly interact with one another unless they have been formally introduced. In the context of today's lesson, Ms. Kim has taken it upon herself to introduce herself to you, the student.

  2. 저는

    This word is composed of two parts: 저 and 는.
    저 is a Korean noun meaning "I"; it is a polite, humble form.
    -는 is a particle that is used to mark the topic of the sentence.
    Taken together, "저는" means "as for me..."

  3. 김 수미

    Note that in Korea, family names precede given names. Thus "Sumi Kim" introduces herself in Korean as "Kim Sumi." When addressing and referring to non-Asians, the practice of placing the family name first is typically relaxed, and the Western order of "First-Last" is observed.

  4. 예요

    This is the verb "to be" when used as an "equals" sign. Note that in Korean, the verb appears at the END of the sentence; as such the entire sentence can be translated word-for-word as:
    "As for me, Kim Sumi am."
    When the noun before the verb ends in a consonant, the form "-이에요" is used; when the noun before the verb ends in a vowel, the form "-예요" is used.

    In Korean, this verb is joined directly to the preceding noun (with no spaces in between) to form a single word. In various parts of this lesson, the verbal element -이에요/-예요 has been marked off as a separate word (as distinct from its adjoined noun) only so that you can see the details of this grammatical construction.

  5. 한국 사람

    The item 한국사람 is composed of two parts:
    한국 is the word meaning "Korea (the country)" and
    사람 is a neutral (non-honorific) term meaning "person"
    Note that in the People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea), the word 조선 "Chosun" is used in place of 한국.

  6. 이에요

    Notice that this sentence -- 한국 사람이에요 -- has no overt topic or subject. It could be translated as simply "Is a Korean person." In Korean, when the topic is clear from context, it is often left out. In this case, Sumi is talking about herself, as as such, does need to begin each sentence with "As for me."

  7. 학생이

    The item 학생이 is composed of two parts:
    학생 is a noun meaning 'student.'
    -이 is a particle that marks the subject of a sentence.
    When the noun before the subject marker ends with a consonant, the subject marker takes the form "이." When the nown before the subject marker ends with a vowel, the subject marker takes the form "가."

    The difference between the topic marker (는/은) and the subject marker (이/가) is often difficult to master at first. A reasonable strategy to be begin with is this:
    X+topic = "As for X, ..."
    X+subject = "An X" or "The X"

  8. 아니에요.

    The item 아니에요 -- meaning "is not" -- is the opposite of the verbal element -이에요 / -예요.

    When using 아니에요, the general formula is to establish a TOPIC and then use a SUBJECT to say what the topic is not. For example:
    >> X는 Y가 아니에요 = "(As for) X, (it) is not (a) Y."
    >> 수미는 학생이 아니에요 = "Sumi is not a student."


  9. 한국말

    Alongside this form, 한국말 "han-gung-mal" you may also encounter the phrase 한국어 pronounced "han-gug-uh"; both mean "Korean language." Even though both words carry the same general meaning--"language"--for some speakers, the form 말 is less educated or sophisticated

  10. 분 is the honorific counterpart to 사람. 분 is used in cases where the speaker wishes to show respect toward the person being spoken to or about.

  11. 박인호 선생님

    In this case, the phrase "선생(님)" does not mean "teacher" but rather is a form of address that shows respect, somewhat along the lines of "Mr." or "Ms." or "Mrs." As a term of address, -선생 can be used with either men or women. The addition of the particle -님 makes it clear that the speaker is showing the referent respect.

    Note the order of elements: Last.Name + First.Name + Title.
    When using 선생님 as a title, first name is optional:
    박 선생님 = "Mr./Ms. Park"
    박 인호선생님 = "Mr. Inho Park"
    김 수미선생님 = "Ms. Sumi Kim"

  12. -도 is a particle that attaches to nouns to mean "also" or "too." Note that it must be attached to a noun; unlike English "also/too," -도 can NEVER be used at the very end of a sentence.

  13. 그러나

    Unlike English "however" -- which may appear at the beginning or end of sentence -- the Korean word 그러나 must always appear at the beginning of a sentence.

  14. 한국말 선생님이 아니에요.

    Note that this sentence with 아니에요 "not be" has no overt topic. The "missing" topic is understood to be Mr. Park (박선생님은 "As for Mr. Park...").

  15. 남자가 아니에요

    From a "realism" perspective, this utterance is a strange thing for Ms. Kim to say. The phrase does, however, serve an educational purpose. On the one hand, it reinforces the use of the negative pattern ("X is not...").
    Moreover, it may prove useful for a non-Korean speaking student, particularly when assessing the gender of names. Foe non-Koreans, it is difficult to know if a given name belongs to a woman or a man. Hence you might ask, "Is so-and-so a woman?" and receive back a response of the sort you see here: "No, not woman, a man."

  16. 바쁘세요?

    In this context, 바쁘세요?means "are you busy?"
    The element "-세-" within the verb is an HONORIFIC marker. It indicates that the speaker is showing respect for the adressee.

    It is very important to note that in the next line of the dialogue, Mr. Park replies using the verb 바빠요. Note here that the verb form is slightly different. Most noticeable is the absence of the -세- element. When speaking about oneself, one does NOT use an honorific form, but rather a plain form of the verb.

  17. 그것이 무엇이에요?

    This phrase has been given here in rather formal, written style. In spoken Korean, it is likely to be contracted as follows: 그게 뭐예요?
    It is important to recognize both forms, the contracted *and* the uncontracted, more formal (or "literate").

  18. 이것은 책이에요.

    This sentence could be literally translated as follows:
    "As for this thing, is-a-book."
    Here we find:
    1. a topic: 이 것은 'as for this thing'
    2. no subject
    3. a verb: 책이에요 'is a book'

  19. 한국말

    Alternative form: 한국어. In this case, "어" means "language," and is derived from Chinese. "말" also means "speech/language" but is a native Korean word.

  20. "그" is a demonstrative adjective meaning "that" (near you, the listener). Compare 그 with its counterparts:
    이 "this" (near me, the speaker) and
    저 "that/yonder" (away from both speaker and listener).

  21. 일본

    일본 is the word meaning "Japan." It is composed of two parts: 일 meaning "sun" and 본 meaning "source, root" -- in other words, "Land of the Rising Sun."

  22. 약속이 있는데요...

    This is polite way to bring a conversation to a close, provided that you have something you need to do. At this stage in your career as a Korean learner, knowing the exact grammatical structure of this sentence is far LESS important than knowing how to pronounce it and when to use it!

  23. --> What have you learned in this unit?

    1. How to introduce yourself.
    2. How to identify people and objects using the verb -이에요/-예요.
    3. How to ask for identifying information using 무엇 "what."
    4. Demonstrative adjectives meaning "this," "that," and "yon."
    5. The names of countries and common objects -- see supplemental lessons.

  24. --> How can you further develop your skills?

    - Practice introducing yourself to Korean friends.
    - Practice asking about and identifying common objects.
    - Learn to identify countries on a globe or map.
    - Try to BUILD conversations based not only on the materials
    covered here in Unit 2, but also on the phrases you've memorized
    from Unit 1. (You haven't forgotten them already, have you?)

Close video window

Close video window

Korean: Word View, click below to listen
제 이과 -- 제 2 과 -- Unit Two
안녕하세요? -- Hello Play Video


Meet Ms. Sumi Kim, one of your two Korean teachers!
안녕하세요
처음 뵙겠습니다
저는 김 수미예요
한국 사람이에요
저는 학생이 아니에요
선생이에요
한국말 선생이에요

Ms. Kim would like you to meet Mr. Park, your other Korean teacher.
분은 박인호 선생님이에요
박선생님도 한국 사람이에요
그러나 한국말 선생님이 아니에요
영어 선생님이에요
박선생님은 남자예요
그러나 저는 남자가 아니에요
여자예요

Dialogue Play Video

Ms. Kim enters the room where Mr. Park is working and says:
Ms. Kim: 박선생님안녕하세요
Mr. Park: 김선생님안녕하세요
Ms. Kim: 요즘 바쁘세요
Mr. Park: 바빠요김선생님도 바쁘세요
Ms. Kim: 바빠요박선생님, 그것이 무엇이에요
Mr. Park: 이것은 책이에요
Ms. Kim: 한국말 책이에요
Mr. Park: 아니오영어책이에요
김선생님그것이 무엇이에요?
Ms. Kim: 이것은 신문이에요
Mr. Park: 영어 신문이에요
Ms. Kim: 아니오일본말 신문이에요
저...약속이 있는데요...
그럼안녕히 계세요
Mr. Park: 안녕히 가세요

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
Direct links to additional lessons: countries objects


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Korean: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 이과 -- 제 2 과 -- Unit Two
안녕하세요? -- Hello Play Video


Meet Ms. Sumi Kim, one of your two Korean teachers!
안녕하세요?
처음 뵙겠습니다.
저는 김 수미예요.
한국 사람이에요.
저는 학생이 아니에요.
선생이에요.
한국말 선생이에요.

Ms. Kim would like you to meet Mr. Park, your other Korean teacher.
이 분은 박인호 선생님이에요.
박선생님도 한국 사람이에요.
그러나 한국말 선생님이 아니에요.
영어 선생님이에요.
박선생님은 남자예요.
그러나 저는 남자가 아니에요.
여자예요.

Dialogue Play Video

Ms. Kim enters the room where Mr. Park is working and says:
Ms. Kim: 박선생님,안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 네.김선생님,안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.요즘 바쁘세요?
Mr. Park: 네,바빠요.김선생님도 바쁘세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,바빠요.박선생님, 그것이 무엇이에요?
Mr. Park: 이것은 책이에요.
Ms. Kim: 한국말 책이에요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 영어책이에요.
김선생님,그것이 무엇이에요?
Ms. Kim: 이것은 신문이에요.
Mr. Park: 영어 신문이에요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오.일본말 신문이에요.
저...약속이 있는데요...
그럼,안녕히 계세요.
Mr. Park: 네,안녕히 가세요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
Direct links to additional lessons: countries objects


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
제 이과 -- 제 2 과 -- Unit Two
안녕하세요? -- Hello Play Video


Meet Ms. Sumi Kim, one of your two Korean teachers!
안녕하세요
처음 뵙겠습니다
저는 김 수미예요
한국 사람이에요
저는 학생이 아니에요
선생이에요
한국말 선생이에요

Ms. Kim would like you to meet Mr. Park, your other Korean teacher.
분은 박인호 선생님이에요
박선생님도 한국 사람이에요
그러나 한국말 선생님이 아니에요
영어 선생님이에요
박선생님은 남자예요
그러나 저는 남자가 아니에요
여자예요

Dialogue Play Video

Ms. Kim enters the room where Mr. Park is working and says:
Ms. Kim: 박선생님안녕하세요
Mr. Park: 김선생님안녕하세요
Ms. Kim: 요즘 바쁘세요
Mr. Park: 바빠요김선생님도 바쁘세요
Ms. Kim: 바빠요박선생님, 그것이 무엇이에요
Mr. Park: 이것은 책이에요
Ms. Kim: 한국말 책이에요
Mr. Park: 아니오영어책이에요
김선생님그것이 무엇이에요?
Ms. Kim: 이것은 신문이에요
Mr. Park: 영어 신문이에요
Ms. Kim: 아니오일본말 신문이에요
저...약속이 있는데요...
그럼안녕히 계세요
Mr. Park: 안녕히 가세요

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
Direct links to additional lessons: countries objects


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Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 이과 -- 제 2 과 -- Unit Two
안녕하세요? -- Hello Play Video


Meet Ms. Sumi Kim, one of your two Korean teachers!
안녕하세요?
처음 뵙겠습니다.
저는 김 수미예요.
한국 사람이에요.
저는 학생이 아니에요.
선생이에요.
한국말 선생이에요.

Ms. Kim would like you to meet Mr. Park, your other Korean teacher.
이 분은 박인호 선생님이에요.
박선생님도 한국 사람이에요.
그러나 한국말 선생님이 아니에요.
영어 선생님이에요.
박선생님은 남자예요.
그러나 저는 남자가 아니에요.
여자예요.

Dialogue Play Video

Ms. Kim enters the room where Mr. Park is working and says:
Ms. Kim: 박선생님,안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 네.김선생님,안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.요즘 바쁘세요?
Mr. Park: 네,바빠요.김선생님도 바쁘세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,바빠요.박선생님, 그것이 무엇이에요?
Mr. Park: 이것은 책이에요.
Ms. Kim: 한국말 책이에요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 영어책이에요.
김선생님,그것이 무엇이에요?
Ms. Kim: 이것은 신문이에요.
Mr. Park: 영어 신문이에요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오.일본말 신문이에요.
저...약속이 있는데요...
그럼,안녕히 계세요.
Mr. Park: 네,안녕히 가세요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
Direct links to additional lessons: countries objects


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com