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제 칠과 -- 제 7 과 -- Unit Seven
쇼핑 연습 -- Shopping Practice

In this lesson, you find Mr. Smith expressing worry about having to go shopping alone for the first time. It's important to note that in this situation, he's talking not to you, but to himself. Let's listen in on what he's saying... Play Video

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내일 쇼핑1 쇼핑
Although it's spelled 쇼핑 and so should be pronounced "sho-ping," many Koreans give this word a more English pronunciation, as if it were spelled "샤핑."
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가 볼까2 가 볼까
This construction -- Verb + 을/ㄹ까 -- means "shall I do such-and-such?" in the sense of WONDERING about the future.
The first element is identical to the first part of the FUTURE TENSE construction (e.g. 할 거에요 'will do,' 갈 거에요 'will go').
Next we find the suffix -까, which is used in constructions of thinking about or wondering. (See sentence #3 in the reading).
* Compare the following:
가요 "I go," "I am going"
갈 거에요 "I will go" (for certain)
가볼거에요 "I will try to go" (for certain)
갈까 "(I wonder,) should I go?"
가볼까? "(I wonder,) should I try to go?"
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[Note the lack of -요 throughout!]3 [Note the lack of -요 throughout!]
Throughout this passage you may note the absence of sentence-final -요. Recall that -요 functions as a means to mark the speaker's utterances as being informal but polite. In talking to oneself, however, such politeness is unecessary. Thus we find Mr. Smith using "informal plain" speech to himself. This form of speaking, called 반말 (pronounced "pammal"), is widely used in Korea, particularly among people who are very close, such certain family members, couples, and very close friends. Adults will often also use "pammal" when addressing children. Generally speaking, the "pammal" forms are created by simply deleting sentence-final -요.

A WORD OF CAUTION!! When in doubt, do * not * use "pammal"; it's considered very intimate. When used inappropriately, it may give the appearance that the speaker is being intentionally rude or disrespectful.
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4
A 요 (or 담요) is a Korean style sleeping mat, much like a futon. In Korea, it is customary to sleep on a 요 that is spread on the floor. To this one adds a blanket (이불) and a pillow (베개). Each morning, the mat is rolled up and placed in a corner of the room (or into a closet or a wardrobe) with the blanket and pillow, thereby allowing the room to be used for other purposes. In many homes, the floors of the sleeping/living rooms are lacquered paper over thin wood with hot water pipes running underneath. These floors (called 온돌) are heated only in cold weather.
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하고 이불이 필요하니까5 필요하니까
This verb is made up of two parts:
필요하 + 니까(요)
'need' + '...because'
(from 필요하다)
When used sentence finally, verbs with the form ROOT+니까(요) can be translated as incomplete sentences beginning with "Because..." or as sentences beginning "It's because..."
왜 걱정이 돼요? "Why are you nervous?"
한국말 못 하니까요. "Because I can't speak Korean."
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음, 어디로6 어디로
In this use of 어디 'where' we find the suffix -로. In many cases,
어디로 can be seen as similar to the form 어디에. In the case of
어디로, however, the sense of "where" carries a feeling of "direction toward," emphasizing more the path and not so much the ultimate destination. Hence we might translate 어디로 갈까?as "I wonder where I should head to..."
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갈까7 갈까
Used without the verb 하다, the form
Verb.Root+을/ㄹ 까
is used to mean "I wonder if I should..." or "Shall I..."

When spoken to another person, the form is used with sentence-final -요 and takes on a plural interpretation: "Shall we...?"

집에 갈까? "Shall go home?"
or "I wonder if I should go home."
같이 갈까요? "Shall we go together?"
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글쎄. 남대문8 남대문
Namdaemun (남대문) or "the Great South Gate" is among the most famous landmarks in Seoul. Once the city's main southern entrance, it has been restored and sits at the middle of a large landscaped traffic rotary. Namdaemun, which has been designated Korea's "National Treasure #1," lends its name to the neighborhood and the expansive marketplace in its vicinity.
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시장9 시장
There are a wide range of shopping options in a city such as Seoul. One can shop at the more traditional 시장, where bargaining can still be done. Major "shijangs" are located near Namdaemun, Tongdaemun, and Shinch'on. One can also shop at any number of department stores (백화점), many of which are located in downtown Seoul. There is also shopping to be had in smaller, boutique-like stores in Seoul's Myongdong district. Finally, many foreigners take their money to the Itaewon district, located just north of the Han River near the Yongsan Army Base. If you shop in Itaewon, however, you'll have less opportunity to practice your Korean language skills, as most shops have merchants conversant in both English and Japanese.
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가 볼까10 가 볼까
Verbs in the form ROOT + 보다 ("to see") convey a sense of trying to do something. ("Do such-and-such and see what happens...")

읽어요 "read" 읽어봐요 "try to read"
해요 "do" 해봐요 "try to do"

When used with the honorific marker, this construction can be used to form
polite commands:
읽어 보세요! "Try to read it"
해 보세요 "Try to do it" ("Give it a try")
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? ( 남대문 시장 남대문 시장
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)
그러나 11
Now we see that in fact, 좀 doesn't really mean "please" but "a little (bit)"; when used in the context of a request, however, it is interpreted as "please."
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걱정이 돼네.
왜?
혼자 가니까.
또 한국말도 잘 못 하니까.
미리 쇼핑 대화를 연습해야 돼12 연습해야 돼
This construction implies necessity or obligation -- "I have to do something." The form 연습해야 돼 includes three parts:

연습해 + 야 돼(요)
Verb Root + 'ya' 'do/make'

(The verb ROOT is the form of the verb used with the regular -요 form, but with the -요 removed.)
가야 돼요. "I have to go."
해야 돼요. "I have to do (it)."
공부해야 돼요. "I have to study."

Remember a phrase from Unit 3? 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요.
("I still have a lot to learn.")
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자...김선생님이 계실까?


After talking to himself about his situation, he decides to locate Ms. Kim and ask her to help him by role playing. She agrees to pretend that he's a store clerk (점원)... Play Video

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점원: 어서 오세요. 무엇을 찾으세요?13 무엇을 찾으세요?
Alternative colloquial form: 뭘 찾으세요?
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스미스: 담요 있어요?
점원: 네,있어요.좋은 것 많아요.
스미스: 편하고 값이 좀 싼 것14 편하고 값이 좀 싼 것
This noun is quite complex. Let's pull it apart...
편하 - 고 값-이 좀 싼 것
comfortable-and price-SUBJECT little bit inexpensive-ADJECT thing
When used as a phrase, we get "a comfortable but somewhat inexpensive one."
VERBAL FORMS ADJECTIVAL FORMS
편하다 "to be comfortable" 편한 "comfortable"
싸다 "to be inexpensive" 싼 "inexpensive"
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보여 주세요15 보여 주세요
Literally "show - give."
보여요 "show / be seen" (dictionary form = 보이다)
주어요 "give" (dictionary form = 주다)
The verbs in tandem mean "show for me" or "show to me."
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점원: 노란 16
Here the short noun 것 means "one" as in "the yellow one"; it's a so-called "dummy noun" and carries no real meaning.
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하고 흰 것이 있는데요.
스미스: 노란 것은 얼마에요?
점원: 오만17
The sole monetary unit in the Republic of Korea is the won (often abbreviated as "W" before the amount). As of this writing, Korean currency is produced in a range of coins from W1 (very tiny and very rare) to W100 (quite common) to W500 (also quite common), with other increments in between. There are only three denominations of bills:
W1,000 W5,000 W10,000
As many items in Korea cost well over 10,000 won, you must keep in mind several facts:
1. Prices for moderately to very expensive items have very large numbers attached to them: W250,000, W1,000,000, etc. Therefore it's well worth learning to count in very high numbers.
2. Since the largest bill is only 10,000, cash transactions in Korea may sometimes require large stacks of bills, if not bags of money. [One can sometimes spot a bank employee walking down a street in Seoul with a paper sack full of cash, presumably for some large transaction.]
3. Credit cards, bank checks (in the amount of W100,000), and electronic bank transfers have become increasingly common in Korea. It is often the case, for example, that one can order merchandise by phone or mail and pay at a local bank by depositing the funds to the seller's business number.
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이에요.
스미스: 흰 것은요?
점원: 흰 것은 칠만
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이에요.
스미스: 노란 것을 주세요.
점원: 네.
혹시 이불은 안 필요하세요?
스미스: 네.따뜻하고 가벼운18 가벼운
Here 가벼운 means "light" in the sense of "not heavy." It's verbal counterpart is 가볍다 "to be light" --> 가벼워요 (the -요 form).
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것이 있어요?
점원: 있고 말고요. 이 것은 한국산19 한국산
Literally "Korea made." Note also:
미국산 "American made"
외국산 "Foreign made"
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이에요.
스미스: 얼마지요?
점원: 육만 오천원이에요. 싸 드릴까요20 싸 드릴까요
This item consists of four parts:
싸 드릴 까 요
wrap give-honorific shall/wonder informal-polite
Using different verb roots in place of 싸 we can create a range of useful expressions:
보여 드릴까요? "Shall I show it to you?"
해 드릴까요? "Shall I do it for you?"
써 드릴까요? "Shall I write it for you?"

Note that an appropriate response uses the form Verb-Root 주세요:
네,보여 주세요. "Yes, please show it to me."
네,해 주세요. "Yes, please do it for me."
네,써 주세요. "Yes, please write it for me."
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스미스: 네.
-- After the clerk packs the mat and blanket Mr. Smith asks: --
스미스: 전부 얼마에요?
점원: 십 일만 오천원이에요.
스미스: 크레디트 카드21 크레디트 카드
Other ways to pay for things:
현금 'cash'
수표 'check'
여행자 수표 'travelers check'

The general word for "money" is 돈. From this we can create:
한국돈 'Korean money'
미국돈 'American money'
일본돈 'Japanese money'
Generally speaking, larger establishments accept cash, credit cards, and bank checks. Smaller shops may work on a cash-only basis. Foreign currency is not generally accepted throughout Korea, except in areas with high concentrations of foreign residents, such as It'aewon in Seoul. Most banks do handle currency exchange, and ATMs are readily found in major Korean cities.
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를 받으세요?
점원: 네,받아요.잠깐만 기다리세요.
-- After the clerk returns from the credit card machine she says: --
점원: 영수증 여기 있어요.감사합니다.
스미스: 네.22 네.
Note that in this situation, 네 carries no real linguistic content. It's merely acknowledgement of having received the receipt.
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수고하세요23 수고하세요
This is the usual leave-taking phrase spoken by the customer. In such a context it means "Work hard!"
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점원: 네.또 오세요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?24 --> What have you learned in this unit?
1. How to talk to yourself in Korean using "pammal."
2. How to interact with a merchant or salesclerk:
- inquiring about the availability of merchandise
- asking questions about merchandise
- asking about the price
- indicating your choice(s)
3. How to indicate a reason using Verb+니까 ("because...")
4. How to use more than one adjective to modify a noun.
5. Use of the verb 주다 both alone (meaning "give") and with other verbs (to mean "do X for me").

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--> How can you further develop your skills?25 --> How can you further develop your skills?
- Role play with a partner; take turns being the clerk and the customer.
- Make up internal dialogues in which you ask yourself questions about what you think you might do tomorrow (or next week, etc.).
- Head to Seoul for a combination shopping trip / language lesson!
- Use media resources (such as the WWW and newspapers) to determine the current value of the Korean won. Translate prices from your own currency into won -- and then PRACTICE saying the numbers aloud in Korean. (FOR THIS you'll have to spend time looking at the supplemental lesson on Sino-Korean numbers!)
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--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.26 --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Attempting to work with numbers in a foreign language can be very tricky indeed. Thinking about numbers is so automatic for many people that a typical second-language learner will automatically conceptualize numerical concepts in terms of their first (native) language. In this regard, we are often "slaves" to our first language. Recognize this bit of reality and work WITH it -- maybe you'll do the math in your head using your native language, but be dilligent when thinking about the final answer in Korean. One trick: when you're walking around and about, make the effort to read and think about any number you see IN KOREAN. (This strategy is quite easy to do in Seoul, given the huge number of busses--all of which have their route numbers painted quite boldly on the front and sides!)
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Direct links to supplemental units on: Sino-Korean numbers Sino-Korean numbers
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  1. 쇼핑

    Although it's spelled 쇼핑 and so should be pronounced "sho-ping," many Koreans give this word a more English pronunciation, as if it were spelled "샤핑."

  2. 가 볼까

    This construction -- Verb + 을/ㄹ까 -- means "shall I do such-and-such?" in the sense of WONDERING about the future.
    The first element is identical to the first part of the FUTURE TENSE construction (e.g. 할 거에요 'will do,' 갈 거에요 'will go').
    Next we find the suffix -까, which is used in constructions of thinking about or wondering. (See sentence #3 in the reading).
    * Compare the following:
    가요 "I go," "I am going"
    갈 거에요 "I will go" (for certain)
    가볼거에요 "I will try to go" (for certain)
    갈까 "(I wonder,) should I go?"
    가볼까? "(I wonder,) should I try to go?"

  3. [Note the lack of -요 throughout!]

    Throughout this passage you may note the absence of sentence-final -요. Recall that -요 functions as a means to mark the speaker's utterances as being informal but polite. In talking to oneself, however, such politeness is unecessary. Thus we find Mr. Smith using "informal plain" speech to himself. This form of speaking, called 반말 (pronounced "pammal"), is widely used in Korea, particularly among people who are very close, such certain family members, couples, and very close friends. Adults will often also use "pammal" when addressing children. Generally speaking, the "pammal" forms are created by simply deleting sentence-final -요.

    A WORD OF CAUTION!! When in doubt, do * not * use "pammal"; it's considered very intimate. When used inappropriately, it may give the appearance that the speaker is being intentionally rude or disrespectful.

  4. A 요 (or 담요) is a Korean style sleeping mat, much like a futon. In Korea, it is customary to sleep on a 요 that is spread on the floor. To this one adds a blanket (이불) and a pillow (베개). Each morning, the mat is rolled up and placed in a corner of the room (or into a closet or a wardrobe) with the blanket and pillow, thereby allowing the room to be used for other purposes. In many homes, the floors of the sleeping/living rooms are lacquered paper over thin wood with hot water pipes running underneath. These floors (called 온돌) are heated only in cold weather.

  5. 필요하니까

    This verb is made up of two parts:
    필요하 + 니까(요)
    'need' + '...because'
    (from 필요하다)
    When used sentence finally, verbs with the form ROOT+니까(요) can be translated as incomplete sentences beginning with "Because..." or as sentences beginning "It's because..."
    왜 걱정이 돼요? "Why are you nervous?"
    한국말 못 하니까요. "Because I can't speak Korean."

  6. 어디로

    In this use of 어디 'where' we find the suffix -로. In many cases,
    어디로 can be seen as similar to the form 어디에. In the case of
    어디로, however, the sense of "where" carries a feeling of "direction toward," emphasizing more the path and not so much the ultimate destination. Hence we might translate 어디로 갈까?as "I wonder where I should head to..."

  7. 갈까

    Used without the verb 하다, the form
    Verb.Root+을/ㄹ 까
    is used to mean "I wonder if I should..." or "Shall I..."

    When spoken to another person, the form is used with sentence-final -요 and takes on a plural interpretation: "Shall we...?"

    집에 갈까? "Shall go home?"
    or "I wonder if I should go home."
    같이 갈까요? "Shall we go together?"

  8. 남대문

    Namdaemun (남대문) or "the Great South Gate" is among the most famous landmarks in Seoul. Once the city's main southern entrance, it has been restored and sits at the middle of a large landscaped traffic rotary. Namdaemun, which has been designated Korea's "National Treasure #1," lends its name to the neighborhood and the expansive marketplace in its vicinity.

  9. 시장

    There are a wide range of shopping options in a city such as Seoul. One can shop at the more traditional 시장, where bargaining can still be done. Major "shijangs" are located near Namdaemun, Tongdaemun, and Shinch'on. One can also shop at any number of department stores (백화점), many of which are located in downtown Seoul. There is also shopping to be had in smaller, boutique-like stores in Seoul's Myongdong district. Finally, many foreigners take their money to the Itaewon district, located just north of the Han River near the Yongsan Army Base. If you shop in Itaewon, however, you'll have less opportunity to practice your Korean language skills, as most shops have merchants conversant in both English and Japanese.

  10. 가 볼까

    Verbs in the form ROOT + 보다 ("to see") convey a sense of trying to do something. ("Do such-and-such and see what happens...")

    읽어요 "read" 읽어봐요 "try to read"
    해요 "do" 해봐요 "try to do"

    When used with the honorific marker, this construction can be used to form
    polite commands:
    읽어 보세요! "Try to read it"
    해 보세요 "Try to do it" ("Give it a try")

  11. 남대문 시장

  12. Now we see that in fact, 좀 doesn't really mean "please" but "a little (bit)"; when used in the context of a request, however, it is interpreted as "please."

  13. 연습해야 돼

    This construction implies necessity or obligation -- "I have to do something." The form 연습해야 돼 includes three parts:

    연습해 + 야 돼(요)
    Verb Root + 'ya' 'do/make'

    (The verb ROOT is the form of the verb used with the regular -요 form, but with the -요 removed.)
    가야 돼요. "I have to go."
    해야 돼요. "I have to do (it)."
    공부해야 돼요. "I have to study."

    Remember a phrase from Unit 3? 아직도 많이 배워야 돼요.
    ("I still have a lot to learn.")

  14. 무엇을 찾으세요?

    Alternative colloquial form: 뭘 찾으세요?

  15. 편하고 값이 좀 싼 것

    This noun is quite complex. Let's pull it apart...
    편하 - 고 값-이 좀 싼 것
    comfortable-and price-SUBJECT little bit inexpensive-ADJECT thing
    When used as a phrase, we get "a comfortable but somewhat inexpensive one."
    VERBAL FORMS ADJECTIVAL FORMS
    편하다 "to be comfortable" 편한 "comfortable"
    싸다 "to be inexpensive" 싼 "inexpensive"

  16. 보여 주세요

    Literally "show - give."
    보여요 "show / be seen" (dictionary form = 보이다)
    주어요 "give" (dictionary form = 주다)
    The verbs in tandem mean "show for me" or "show to me."

  17. Here the short noun 것 means "one" as in "the yellow one"; it's a so-called "dummy noun" and carries no real meaning.

  18. The sole monetary unit in the Republic of Korea is the won (often abbreviated as "W" before the amount). As of this writing, Korean currency is produced in a range of coins from W1 (very tiny and very rare) to W100 (quite common) to W500 (also quite common), with other increments in between. There are only three denominations of bills:
    W1,000 W5,000 W10,000
    As many items in Korea cost well over 10,000 won, you must keep in mind several facts:
    1. Prices for moderately to very expensive items have very large numbers attached to them: W250,000, W1,000,000, etc. Therefore it's well worth learning to count in very high numbers.
    2. Since the largest bill is only 10,000, cash transactions in Korea may sometimes require large stacks of bills, if not bags of money. [One can sometimes spot a bank employee walking down a street in Seoul with a paper sack full of cash, presumably for some large transaction.]
    3. Credit cards, bank checks (in the amount of W100,000), and electronic bank transfers have become increasingly common in Korea. It is often the case, for example, that one can order merchandise by phone or mail and pay at a local bank by depositing the funds to the seller's business number.

  19. 가벼운

    Here 가벼운 means "light" in the sense of "not heavy." It's verbal counterpart is 가볍다 "to be light" --> 가벼워요 (the -요 form).

  20. 한국산

    Literally "Korea made." Note also:
    미국산 "American made"
    외국산 "Foreign made"

  21. 싸 드릴까요

    This item consists of four parts:
    싸 드릴 까 요
    wrap give-honorific shall/wonder informal-polite
    Using different verb roots in place of 싸 we can create a range of useful expressions:
    보여 드릴까요? "Shall I show it to you?"
    해 드릴까요? "Shall I do it for you?"
    써 드릴까요? "Shall I write it for you?"

    Note that an appropriate response uses the form Verb-Root 주세요:
    네,보여 주세요. "Yes, please show it to me."
    네,해 주세요. "Yes, please do it for me."
    네,써 주세요. "Yes, please write it for me."

  22. 크레디트 카드

    Other ways to pay for things:
    현금 'cash'
    수표 'check'
    여행자 수표 'travelers check'

    The general word for "money" is 돈. From this we can create:
    한국돈 'Korean money'
    미국돈 'American money'
    일본돈 'Japanese money'
    Generally speaking, larger establishments accept cash, credit cards, and bank checks. Smaller shops may work on a cash-only basis. Foreign currency is not generally accepted throughout Korea, except in areas with high concentrations of foreign residents, such as It'aewon in Seoul. Most banks do handle currency exchange, and ATMs are readily found in major Korean cities.

  23. 네.

    Note that in this situation, 네 carries no real linguistic content. It's merely acknowledgement of having received the receipt.

  24. 수고하세요

    This is the usual leave-taking phrase spoken by the customer. In such a context it means "Work hard!"

  25. --> What have you learned in this unit?

    1. How to talk to yourself in Korean using "pammal."
    2. How to interact with a merchant or salesclerk:
    - inquiring about the availability of merchandise
    - asking questions about merchandise
    - asking about the price
    - indicating your choice(s)
    3. How to indicate a reason using Verb+니까 ("because...")
    4. How to use more than one adjective to modify a noun.
    5. Use of the verb 주다 both alone (meaning "give") and with other verbs (to mean "do X for me").

  26. --> How can you further develop your skills?

    - Role play with a partner; take turns being the clerk and the customer.
    - Make up internal dialogues in which you ask yourself questions about what you think you might do tomorrow (or next week, etc.).
    - Head to Seoul for a combination shopping trip / language lesson!
    - Use media resources (such as the WWW and newspapers) to determine the current value of the Korean won. Translate prices from your own currency into won -- and then PRACTICE saying the numbers aloud in Korean. (FOR THIS you'll have to spend time looking at the supplemental lesson on Sino-Korean numbers!)

  27. --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.

    Attempting to work with numbers in a foreign language can be very tricky indeed. Thinking about numbers is so automatic for many people that a typical second-language learner will automatically conceptualize numerical concepts in terms of their first (native) language. In this regard, we are often "slaves" to our first language. Recognize this bit of reality and work WITH it -- maybe you'll do the math in your head using your native language, but be dilligent when thinking about the final answer in Korean. One trick: when you're walking around and about, make the effort to read and think about any number you see IN KOREAN. (This strategy is quite easy to do in Seoul, given the huge number of busses--all of which have their route numbers painted quite boldly on the front and sides!)

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Korean: Word View, click below to listen
제 칠과 -- 제 7 과 -- Unit Seven
쇼핑 연습 -- Shopping Practice

In this lesson, you find Mr. Smith expressing worry about having to go shopping alone for the first time. It's important to note that in this situation, he's talking not to you, but to himself. Let's listen in on what he's saying... Play Video

내일 쇼핑을 가 볼까? [Note the lack of -요 throughout!]
요하고 이불이 필요하니까
어디로 갈까
글쎄남대문 시장에 가 볼까? (남대문 시장)
그러나 걱정이 돼네

혼자 가니까
한국말도 하니까
미리 쇼핑 대화를 연습해야 돼
...김선생님이 계실까


After talking to himself about his situation, he decides to locate Ms. Kim and ask her to help him by role playing. She agrees to pretend that he's a store clerk (점원)... Play Video

점원: 어서 오세요무엇을 찾으세요
스미스: 담요 있어요
점원: 있어요좋은 많아요
스미스: 편하고 값이 것을 보여 주세요
점원: 노란 것하고 흰 것이 있는데요
스미스: 노란 것은 얼마에요
점원: 오만원이에요
스미스: 흰 것은요
점원: 흰 것은 칠만원이에요
스미스: 노란 것을 주세요
점원:
혹시 이불은 필요하세요
스미스: 따뜻하고 가벼운 것이 있어요
점원: 있고 말고요 것은 한국산이에요
스미스: 얼마지요
점원: 육만 오천원이에요싸 드릴까요
스미스:
-- After the clerk packs the mat and blanket Mr. Smith asks: --
스미스: 전부 얼마에요
점원: 십 일만 오천원이에요
스미스: 크레디트 카드를 받으세요
점원: 받아요잠깐만 기다리세요
-- After the clerk returns from the credit card machine she says: --
점원: 영수증 여기 있어요감사합니다
스미스: 수고하세요
점원: 오세요

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Direct links to supplemental units on: Sino-Korean numbers


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Korean: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 칠과 -- 제 7 과 -- Unit Seven
쇼핑 연습 -- Shopping Practice

In this lesson, you find Mr. Smith expressing worry about having to go shopping alone for the first time. It's important to note that in this situation, he's talking not to you, but to himself. Let's listen in on what he's saying... Play Video

내일 쇼핑을 가 볼까? [Note the lack of -요 throughout!]
새 요하고 이불이 필요하니까.
음,어디로 갈까?
글쎄. 남대문 시장에 가 볼까? (남대문 시장)
그러나 좀 걱정이 돼네.
왜?
혼자 가니까.
또 한국말도 잘 못 하니까.
미리 쇼핑 대화를 연습해야 돼.
자...김선생님이 계실까?


After talking to himself about his situation, he decides to locate Ms. Kim and ask her to help him by role playing. She agrees to pretend that he's a store clerk (점원)... Play Video

점원: 어서 오세요.무엇을 찾으세요?
스미스: 담요 있어요?
점원: 네,있어요.좋은 것 많아요.
스미스: 편하고 값이 좀 싼 것을 보여 주세요.
점원: 노란 것하고 흰 것이 있는데요.
스미스: 노란 것은 얼마에요?
점원: 오만원이에요.
스미스: 흰 것은요?
점원: 흰 것은 칠만원이에요.
스미스: 노란 것을 주세요.
점원: 네.
혹시 이불은 안 필요하세요?
스미스: 네.따뜻하고 가벼운 것이 있어요?
점원: 있고 말고요. 이 것은 한국산이에요.
스미스: 얼마지요?
점원: 육만 오천원이에요.싸 드릴까요?
스미스: 네.
-- After the clerk packs the mat and blanket Mr. Smith asks: --
스미스: 전부 얼마에요?
점원: 십 일만 오천원이에요.
스미스: 크레디트 카드를 받으세요?
점원: 네,받아요.잠깐만 기다리세요.
-- After the clerk returns from the credit card machine she says: --
점원: 영수증 여기 있어요.감사합니다.
스미스: 네.수고하세요.
점원: 네.또 오세요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Direct links to supplemental units on: Sino-Korean numbers


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
제 칠과 -- 제 7 과 -- Unit Seven
쇼핑 연습 -- Shopping Practice

In this lesson, you find Mr. Smith expressing worry about having to go shopping alone for the first time. It's important to note that in this situation, he's talking not to you, but to himself. Let's listen in on what he's saying... Play Video

내일 쇼핑을 가 볼까? [Note the lack of -요 throughout!]
요하고 이불이 필요하니까
어디로 갈까
글쎄남대문 시장에 가 볼까? (남대문 시장)
그러나 걱정이 돼네

혼자 가니까
한국말도 하니까
미리 쇼핑 대화를 연습해야 돼
...김선생님이 계실까


After talking to himself about his situation, he decides to locate Ms. Kim and ask her to help him by role playing. She agrees to pretend that he's a store clerk (점원)... Play Video

점원: 어서 오세요무엇을 찾으세요
스미스: 담요 있어요
점원: 있어요좋은 많아요
스미스: 편하고 값이 것을 보여 주세요
점원: 노란 것하고 흰 것이 있는데요
스미스: 노란 것은 얼마에요
점원: 오만원이에요
스미스: 흰 것은요
점원: 흰 것은 칠만원이에요
스미스: 노란 것을 주세요
점원:
혹시 이불은 필요하세요
스미스: 따뜻하고 가벼운 것이 있어요
점원: 있고 말고요 것은 한국산이에요
스미스: 얼마지요
점원: 육만 오천원이에요싸 드릴까요
스미스:
-- After the clerk packs the mat and blanket Mr. Smith asks: --
스미스: 전부 얼마에요
점원: 십 일만 오천원이에요
스미스: 크레디트 카드를 받으세요
점원: 받아요잠깐만 기다리세요
-- After the clerk returns from the credit card machine she says: --
점원: 영수증 여기 있어요감사합니다
스미스: 수고하세요
점원: 오세요

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Direct links to supplemental units on: Sino-Korean numbers


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 칠과 -- 제 7 과 -- Unit Seven
쇼핑 연습 -- Shopping Practice

In this lesson, you find Mr. Smith expressing worry about having to go shopping alone for the first time. It's important to note that in this situation, he's talking not to you, but to himself. Let's listen in on what he's saying... Play Video

내일 쇼핑을 가 볼까? [Note the lack of -요 throughout!]
새 요하고 이불이 필요하니까.
음,어디로 갈까?
글쎄. 남대문 시장에 가 볼까? (남대문 시장)
그러나 좀 걱정이 돼네.
왜?
혼자 가니까.
또 한국말도 잘 못 하니까.
미리 쇼핑 대화를 연습해야 돼.
자...김선생님이 계실까?


After talking to himself about his situation, he decides to locate Ms. Kim and ask her to help him by role playing. She agrees to pretend that he's a store clerk (점원)... Play Video

점원: 어서 오세요.무엇을 찾으세요?
스미스: 담요 있어요?
점원: 네,있어요.좋은 것 많아요.
스미스: 편하고 값이 좀 싼 것을 보여 주세요.
점원: 노란 것하고 흰 것이 있는데요.
스미스: 노란 것은 얼마에요?
점원: 오만원이에요.
스미스: 흰 것은요?
점원: 흰 것은 칠만원이에요.
스미스: 노란 것을 주세요.
점원: 네.
혹시 이불은 안 필요하세요?
스미스: 네.따뜻하고 가벼운 것이 있어요?
점원: 있고 말고요. 이 것은 한국산이에요.
스미스: 얼마지요?
점원: 육만 오천원이에요.싸 드릴까요?
스미스: 네.
-- After the clerk packs the mat and blanket Mr. Smith asks: --
스미스: 전부 얼마에요?
점원: 십 일만 오천원이에요.
스미스: 크레디트 카드를 받으세요?
점원: 네,받아요.잠깐만 기다리세요.
-- After the clerk returns from the credit card machine she says: --
점원: 영수증 여기 있어요.감사합니다.
스미스: 네.수고하세요.
점원: 네.또 오세요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Direct links to supplemental units on: Sino-Korean numbers


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com