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제 오과 -- 제 5 과 -- Unit Five
우리 교실1 우리 교실
It is often the case that in Korean you will find 우리 "our" in places where an English speaker would very likely use "my"; for example, note that Ms. Kim refers to the classroom in which she teaches as 우리 교실 (literally "our classroom") and not "my classroom." Other common phrases in which Koreans might prefer to use 우리 "our" instead of "my":
우리 나라 "my (home) country"
우리 부모님 "my parents"
우리 가족 "my family"
우리 집 "my house"
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-- Our Classroom

Ms. Kim tells you about the classroom in which she teaches Korean. Play Video

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여기는 우리 교실이에요 여기는 우리 교실이에요
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교실 앞 쪽에2 교실 앞 쪽에
This phrase has three main parts:
교실 앞쪽 에
classroom front.side location.suffix
Whereas English uses prepositions to mark relationships between nouns, Korean uses POSTPOSITIONS; Korean postposes (places behind) the relative location word (e.g. "on top of", "next to", "below"). The formula for such constructions is typically as follows:

Noun + Postposition + Location.Suffix
책상 + 위 + 에
"desk" + "top" + location = on top of the desk
책상 + 밑 + 에
"desk" + "below" + location = under the desk
책상 + 옆 + 에
"desk" + "beside" + location = next to the desk
책상 + 앞 + 에
"desk" + "front" + location = in front of the desk

책상 + 앞쪽 + 에
"desk" + "front side" + location = at/on the front end of the desk
책상 + 옆쪽 + 에
"desk" + "side side" + location = at/on the side of the desk


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칠판이 칠판이
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있어요3 있어요
Note that this word -- 있어요 -- is SPLIT over two lines.
Recall that splitting a word from the end of one line to the beginning of the next line is perfectly acceptable in Korean.
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.그리고 교실 오른 쪽에는 창문이 있어요. 작은 창문4 작은 창문
As in English, adjectives in Korean appear in front of the noun they modify:
책 ...book
작은 책 ...... small book
큰 책 ...... large book
흰 책 ...... white book
검은 책 ...... black book
좋은 책 ...... good book
이 좋은 책 ......... this good book
그 좋은 책 ......... that good book
저 좋은 책 ......... yon good book

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이지오? 왼 쪽에는 칠판이 또 하나 있고 문이 있어요 왼 쪽에는 칠판이 또 하나 있고 문이 있어요
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.그리고 교실 뒷 쪽에는 벽이 있어요.
교실 안에는 책상과 의자가 많아요5 많아요
The verb 많아요 (dictionary form = 많다) means "to be many," "to be numerous," "to be a lot." Notice that there is no separate part of the verb that means "to be"; the sense of "to be" is understood.

> 책이 많아요. 'book many' "There are lots of books"
> 책이 적어요. 'book few' "There are few books"
> 책이 작아요. 'book small' "The book(s) is/are small"
> 책이 커요. 'book large' "The book(s) is/are large"
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책상 위에 책상 위에
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책하고 신문이 있어요. 책 중에는6 책 중에는
This phrase consists of four elements:
책 중 에 는
books center/among locative topic
책중에는 might be literally translated as "As for among the books..."

This pattern is useful for describing items that make up a specific group:
Group Name중에는 X도 있고 Y도 있어요.
"Among the Group Name, there are both Xs and Ys."

학생중에는 미국사람도 있고 한국사람도 있어요.
"Among the students, there are both Americans and Koreans."
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불어 책 불어 책
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도 있고 스페인말 책 스페인말 책
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도 있어요.그런데 한국말 책은 없군요7 없군요
The verb 없군요 is made up of three elements:
없 군 요
root "not exist" > see below < informal-polite ending
The element - 군 - conveys a feeling of surprise at having realized that a certain situation obtains; it has no direct counterpart in English.
> Compare:
책이 없어요 . "There are no books." >> neutral statement
--vs--
책이 없군요 ! "(Gee!) There are no books!" >> surprise!
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!신문은 미국 신문만 있어요.다른 나라 신문은 없어요.
칠판8
The nominal suffix -과 is attached to nouns and can have two meanings:
1. 'and' -- just like 하고
2. 'with'
In this case, -과 means 'and'. It is used in the following construction:
X과 Y 사이에... 'between X and Y...'

Note that -과 is attached to nouns that end with a CONSONANT:
책상과 의자가 있어요. "There are desks and chairs."
^^^
When the noun ends in a VOWEL, one uses the form -와:
의자와 책상이 있어요. "There are chairs and desks."
^^^
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책상 사이에는 큰 테이블9 테이블
As you might suspect, the Korean word 테이블 'table' has been borrowed from English. Does this mean that Korean never had its * own * word for table? No! Indeed, the Korean word 상 can be translated as 'table.' However, the word 상 is generally used to refer to very short traditional tables used by somebody sitting on the floor. In contrast, a 테이블 is used to refer to a larger table at which one sits using a chair.

> By the way, we now see that the word for 'desk' is a compound form:
책상 'desk' = 책 'book' + 상 'table'
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이 있어요.테이블 위에 무엇이 있지오? 여러 가지 사전 여러 가지 사전
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이 있지오. 영한사전10 영한사전
The phrase 영한 "English-Korean" follows a general pattern whereby two-country (or two-language) descriptors are described by taking one syllable from each name:
영한 "English-Korean"
한영 "Korean-English"
한미 "Korean-American"
미한 "American-Korean"
일한 "Japanese-Korean"
Note that this construction is used to describe dictionaries, companies, associations, etc., but is * not * used to refer to people.
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도 있고 한영사전도 있고 국어11 국어
Literally translated, 국어 means "nation language." In this context, it is understood to mean "Korean (language)." The syllable 국 is used in a wide number of compounds:
국어 nation-language "national language, Korean"
국민 nation-people "the Korean people"
국악 nation-music "traditional Korean music"
국토 nation-land "a country's territory/domain"
국회 nation-meeting "the National Assembly"
국기 nation-flag "national flag"
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사전도 있어요.그리고 옥편12 옥편
An 옥편 is a special dictionary used to look up Chinese Characters.
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도 있어요.
그런데 교실에 컴퓨터도 있나요?아니오. 컴퓨터는 하나도 없어요.13 컴퓨터는 하나도 없어요.
In general, the suffix -도 means 'also.' When used with a negative verb such as 없다 'not exist,' however, -도 takes on the meaning 'not even.'
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Ms. Kim and Mr. Park chat with each other in the instructor's lounge. Play Video

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김: 박선생님,그 것이 무엇이에요?
박: 이거요?이 것은 잡지에요.
김: 미국 잡지예요,한국 잡지예요?14 미국 잡지예요,한국 잡지예요?
This structure is used in places where English might use the word "or." For example, an English speaker might well ask:
"Is it an American magazine or a Korean one?"
In contrast, the Korean approach is to ask two separate questions:
미국 잡지에요, 한국 잡지에요?
"Is it an American magazine, is it a Korean magazine?"
NOTE THE SPEAKER'S INTONATION, which forms a mountain-shape having its peak near the point between the two parts; the pitch of the voice rises to the comma and then falls toward the question mark.
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박: 미국 잡지예요.아, 십자15 십자
The word 십자 literally means "cross" and literally means "10 character." The Chinese character for "10" is 十.
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말풀이가 있군요!
혹시 연필이 있으세요16 있으세요
Note the insertion of the honorific marker "세" in this verb; it makes the question more polite by showing deference to the listener:
연필이 있으세요? "Do you have a pencil?" (with honorific)
연필이 있어요? "Do you have a pencil?" (neutral)
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김: 아니오, 없는데요17 없는데요
This verb, which contains the root form 없- 'not exist' employs the elements -는데- to soften Ms. Kim's reply to Mr. Park.

Ms. Kim could have simply answered Mr. Park's question ("Do you have a pencil?") by simply saying 아니오,없어요 ("No, I don't"). But to use 없어요 in this case--even though it's in an informal polite form-- would be considered too blunt. 없는데요, in contrast, still conveys the fact that she doesn't have a pencil, but gives the sense that there's an alternative. Note that Ms. Kim immediately offers an alternative: "How about a pen?"

One way to think about verbs ending in -는데(요) is to imagine that they're followed by three periods, which implies that some additional statement or appropriate action is to follow.
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.볼펜은 어떠세요?
박: 괜찮아요.
김: 파란 것하고 빨간 것이 있는데요18 있는데요
Once again, the use of 있는데요 indicates that there's more to follow. In this case, Ms. Kim has a blue pen and a red pen... and that she's prepared to lend either one to Mr. Park.
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박: 검은 것이 있으세요?
김: 잠깐만요...네,있어요.
박: 그럼 좀 빌려주실래요19 빌려주실래요
This verb, 빌려주실래요, is a complex future-tense construction used to make a request to borrow. At this point, learn it as a idiomatic expression meaning "may I borrow (it from you)?"

Just as an aside, look at how this verb is constructed:
빌려 주 시 ㄹ래 요
'lend' 'give' honorific future informal.polite
Thus we see that it literally means "will you lend it to my benefit?"

The point of demonstrating this construction is * not * to have you learn it at this stage, but rather to make the point that a single verb in Korean can convey information that corresponds to a multi-word construction in English. In Korean, verbs not only convey information about action and tense, but they can also provide information about the relationship between the speaker and the listener (-시-), the type of interaction (-요), the possibility for additional implications (as we saw with -는데-), the element of surprise (as we saw with -군-), etc.
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김: 네,여기 있어요.
(a few moments later...)
김: 십자말풀이 어떠세요?
박: 참 어렵네요! 영한사전이 있으세요?
김: 아니오,없는데요.한영사전은 어떠세요?
박: 괜찮아요.좀 빌려주실래요?
김: 네,여기 있어요.
박: 고맙습니다.

--> What have you learned in this unit?20 --> What have you learned in this unit?
1. How to describe the location of items using the locative particle -에 in conjunction with the verb 있다 "to exist."
2. How to describe nouns using adjectival forms, both before the noun...
그 책이 커요. "That book is big."
... and as an adjectival verb:
그것이 큰 책이에요. "That (thing) is a big book."
3. How to ask if you can borrow an object using the form 빌려주실래요.

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--> How can you further develop your skills?21 --> How can you further develop your skills?
- Find a partner and practice asking for and giving common objects.
- Using colored pens/markers/crayons, make yourself a color chart and label each color in Korean. Use a dictionary to look up color names you would like to learn.
- Make an inventory of objects found in your office or your classroom or your study space.
- Be on the lookout for words borrowed into Korean from foreign languages (primarily English). In this lesson you've seen "computer" and "table" -- can you find others? (Technological terms, sports, and country names are good candidates for being borrowed words).
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--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.22 --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
In linguistics, the term "borrowed word" is commonly used to describe words that enter a language from another. When two cultures come into contact, such borrowing is generally inevitable. However the term "borrowed" is not the best way to describe this situation -- "borrow" implies that the "borrowing" language gives the word back... Does it? Probably not. Korean words such as 테이블 and 컴퓨터 should be considered Korean.
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Links to additional lessons: adjectives adjectives
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  1. 우리 교실

    It is often the case that in Korean you will find 우리 "our" in places where an English speaker would very likely use "my"; for example, note that Ms. Kim refers to the classroom in which she teaches as 우리 교실 (literally "our classroom") and not "my classroom." Other common phrases in which Koreans might prefer to use 우리 "our" instead of "my":
    우리 나라 "my (home) country"
    우리 부모님 "my parents"
    우리 가족 "my family"
    우리 집 "my house"

  2. 여기는 우리 교실이에요

  3. 교실 앞 쪽에

    This phrase has three main parts:
    교실 앞쪽 에
    classroom front.side location.suffix
    Whereas English uses prepositions to mark relationships between nouns, Korean uses POSTPOSITIONS; Korean postposes (places behind) the relative location word (e.g. "on top of", "next to", "below"). The formula for such constructions is typically as follows:

    Noun + Postposition + Location.Suffix
    책상 + 위 + 에
    "desk" + "top" + location = on top of the desk
    책상 + 밑 + 에
    "desk" + "below" + location = under the desk
    책상 + 옆 + 에
    "desk" + "beside" + location = next to the desk
    책상 + 앞 + 에
    "desk" + "front" + location = in front of the desk

    책상 + 앞쪽 + 에
    "desk" + "front side" + location = at/on the front end of the desk
    책상 + 옆쪽 + 에
    "desk" + "side side" + location = at/on the side of the desk


  4. 칠판이

  5. 있어요

    Note that this word -- 있어요 -- is SPLIT over two lines.
    Recall that splitting a word from the end of one line to the beginning of the next line is perfectly acceptable in Korean.

  6. 작은 창문

    As in English, adjectives in Korean appear in front of the noun they modify:
    책 ...book
    작은 책 ...... small book
    큰 책 ...... large book
    흰 책 ...... white book
    검은 책 ...... black book
    좋은 책 ...... good book
    이 좋은 책 ......... this good book
    그 좋은 책 ......... that good book
    저 좋은 책 ......... yon good book

  7. 왼 쪽에는 칠판이 또 하나 있고 문이 있어요

  8. 많아요

    The verb 많아요 (dictionary form = 많다) means "to be many," "to be numerous," "to be a lot." Notice that there is no separate part of the verb that means "to be"; the sense of "to be" is understood.

    > 책이 많아요. 'book many' "There are lots of books"
    > 책이 적어요. 'book few' "There are few books"
    > 책이 작아요. 'book small' "The book(s) is/are small"
    > 책이 커요. 'book large' "The book(s) is/are large"

  9. 책상 위에

  10. 책 중에는

    This phrase consists of four elements:
    책 중 에 는
    books center/among locative topic
    책중에는 might be literally translated as "As for among the books..."

    This pattern is useful for describing items that make up a specific group:
    Group Name중에는 X도 있고 Y도 있어요.
    "Among the Group Name, there are both Xs and Ys."

    학생중에는 미국사람도 있고 한국사람도 있어요.
    "Among the students, there are both Americans and Koreans."

  11. 불어 책

  12. 스페인말 책

  13. 없군요

    The verb 없군요 is made up of three elements:
    없 군 요
    root "not exist" > see below < informal-polite ending
    The element - 군 - conveys a feeling of surprise at having realized that a certain situation obtains; it has no direct counterpart in English.
    > Compare:
    책이 없어요 . "There are no books." >> neutral statement
    --vs--
    책이 없군요 ! "(Gee!) There are no books!" >> surprise!

  14. The nominal suffix -과 is attached to nouns and can have two meanings:
    1. 'and' -- just like 하고
    2. 'with'
    In this case, -과 means 'and'. It is used in the following construction:
    X과 Y 사이에... 'between X and Y...'

    Note that -과 is attached to nouns that end with a CONSONANT:
    책상과 의자가 있어요. "There are desks and chairs."
    ^^^
    When the noun ends in a VOWEL, one uses the form -와:
    의자와 책상이 있어요. "There are chairs and desks."
    ^^^

  15. 테이블

    As you might suspect, the Korean word 테이블 'table' has been borrowed from English. Does this mean that Korean never had its * own * word for table? No! Indeed, the Korean word 상 can be translated as 'table.' However, the word 상 is generally used to refer to very short traditional tables used by somebody sitting on the floor. In contrast, a 테이블 is used to refer to a larger table at which one sits using a chair.

    > By the way, we now see that the word for 'desk' is a compound form:
    책상 'desk' = 책 'book' + 상 'table'

  16. 여러 가지 사전

  17. 영한사전

    The phrase 영한 "English-Korean" follows a general pattern whereby two-country (or two-language) descriptors are described by taking one syllable from each name:
    영한 "English-Korean"
    한영 "Korean-English"
    한미 "Korean-American"
    미한 "American-Korean"
    일한 "Japanese-Korean"
    Note that this construction is used to describe dictionaries, companies, associations, etc., but is * not * used to refer to people.

  18. 국어

    Literally translated, 국어 means "nation language." In this context, it is understood to mean "Korean (language)." The syllable 국 is used in a wide number of compounds:
    국어 nation-language "national language, Korean"
    국민 nation-people "the Korean people"
    국악 nation-music "traditional Korean music"
    국토 nation-land "a country's territory/domain"
    국회 nation-meeting "the National Assembly"
    국기 nation-flag "national flag"

  19. 옥편

    An 옥편 is a special dictionary used to look up Chinese Characters.

  20. 컴퓨터는 하나도 없어요.

    In general, the suffix -도 means 'also.' When used with a negative verb such as 없다 'not exist,' however, -도 takes on the meaning 'not even.'

  21. 미국 잡지예요,한국 잡지예요?

    This structure is used in places where English might use the word "or." For example, an English speaker might well ask:
    "Is it an American magazine or a Korean one?"
    In contrast, the Korean approach is to ask two separate questions:
    미국 잡지에요, 한국 잡지에요?
    "Is it an American magazine, is it a Korean magazine?"
    NOTE THE SPEAKER'S INTONATION, which forms a mountain-shape having its peak near the point between the two parts; the pitch of the voice rises to the comma and then falls toward the question mark.

  22. 십자

    The word 십자 literally means "cross" and literally means "10 character." The Chinese character for "10" is 十.

  23. 있으세요

    Note the insertion of the honorific marker "세" in this verb; it makes the question more polite by showing deference to the listener:
    연필이 있으세요? "Do you have a pencil?" (with honorific)
    연필이 있어요? "Do you have a pencil?" (neutral)

  24. 없는데요

    This verb, which contains the root form 없- 'not exist' employs the elements -는데- to soften Ms. Kim's reply to Mr. Park.

    Ms. Kim could have simply answered Mr. Park's question ("Do you have a pencil?") by simply saying 아니오,없어요 ("No, I don't"). But to use 없어요 in this case--even though it's in an informal polite form-- would be considered too blunt. 없는데요, in contrast, still conveys the fact that she doesn't have a pencil, but gives the sense that there's an alternative. Note that Ms. Kim immediately offers an alternative: "How about a pen?"

    One way to think about verbs ending in -는데(요) is to imagine that they're followed by three periods, which implies that some additional statement or appropriate action is to follow.

  25. 있는데요

    Once again, the use of 있는데요 indicates that there's more to follow. In this case, Ms. Kim has a blue pen and a red pen... and that she's prepared to lend either one to Mr. Park.

  26. 빌려주실래요

    This verb, 빌려주실래요, is a complex future-tense construction used to make a request to borrow. At this point, learn it as a idiomatic expression meaning "may I borrow (it from you)?"

    Just as an aside, look at how this verb is constructed:
    빌려 주 시 ㄹ래 요
    'lend' 'give' honorific future informal.polite
    Thus we see that it literally means "will you lend it to my benefit?"

    The point of demonstrating this construction is * not * to have you learn it at this stage, but rather to make the point that a single verb in Korean can convey information that corresponds to a multi-word construction in English. In Korean, verbs not only convey information about action and tense, but they can also provide information about the relationship between the speaker and the listener (-시-), the type of interaction (-요), the possibility for additional implications (as we saw with -는데-), the element of surprise (as we saw with -군-), etc.

  27. --> What have you learned in this unit?

    1. How to describe the location of items using the locative particle -에 in conjunction with the verb 있다 "to exist."
    2. How to describe nouns using adjectival forms, both before the noun...
    그 책이 커요. "That book is big."
    ... and as an adjectival verb:
    그것이 큰 책이에요. "That (thing) is a big book."
    3. How to ask if you can borrow an object using the form 빌려주실래요.

  28. --> How can you further develop your skills?

    - Find a partner and practice asking for and giving common objects.
    - Using colored pens/markers/crayons, make yourself a color chart and label each color in Korean. Use a dictionary to look up color names you would like to learn.
    - Make an inventory of objects found in your office or your classroom or your study space.
    - Be on the lookout for words borrowed into Korean from foreign languages (primarily English). In this lesson you've seen "computer" and "table" -- can you find others? (Technological terms, sports, and country names are good candidates for being borrowed words).

  29. --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.

    In linguistics, the term "borrowed word" is commonly used to describe words that enter a language from another. When two cultures come into contact, such borrowing is generally inevitable. However the term "borrowed" is not the best way to describe this situation -- "borrow" implies that the "borrowing" language gives the word back... Does it? Probably not. Korean words such as 테이블 and 컴퓨터 should be considered Korean.

Close video window

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Korean: Word View, click below to listen
제 오과 -- 제 5 과 -- Unit Five
우리 교실 -- Our Classroom

Ms. Kim tells you about the classroom in which she teaches Korean. Play Video

여기는 우리 교실이에요교실 쪽에 칠판이 있어요그리고 교실 오른 쪽에는 창문이 있어요작은 창문이지오 쪽에는 칠판이 또 하나 있고 문이 있어요그리고 교실 뒷 쪽에는 벽이 있어요
교실 안에는 책상과 의자가 많아요책상 위에 책하고 신문이 있어요책 중에는 불어 책도 있고 스페인말 책도 있어요그런데 한국말 책은 없군요신문은 미국 신문만 있어요다른 나라 신문은 없어요
칠판과 책상 사이에는 테이블이 있어요테이블 위에 무엇이 있지오여러 가지 사전이 있지오영한사전도 있고 한영사전도 있고 국어사전도 있어요그리고 옥편도 있어요
그런데 교실에 컴퓨터도 있나요아니오컴퓨터는 하나도 없어요

Ms. Kim and Mr. Park chat with each other in the instructor's lounge. Play Video

김: 박선생님 것이 무엇이에요
박: 이거요 것은 잡지에요
김: 미국 잡지예요한국 잡지예요
박: 미국 잡지예요십자말풀이가 있군요
혹시 연필이 있으세요
김: 아니오없는데요볼펜은 어떠세요
박: 괜찮아요
김: 파란 것하고 빨간 것이 있는데요
박: 검은 것이 있으세요
김: 잠깐만요...있어요
박: 그럼 빌려주실래요
김: 여기 있어요
(a few moments later...)
김: 십자말풀이 어떠세요
박: 어렵네요영한사전이 있으세요
김: 아니오없는데요한영사전은 어떠세요
박: 괜찮아요 빌려주실래요
김: 여기 있어요
박: 고맙습니다

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Links to additional lessons: adjectives


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Korean: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 오과 -- 제 5 과 -- Unit Five
우리 교실 -- Our Classroom

Ms. Kim tells you about the classroom in which she teaches Korean. Play Video

여기는 우리 교실이에요.교실 앞 쪽에 칠판이 있어요.그리고 교실 오른 쪽에는 창문이 있어요.작은 창문이지오?왼 쪽에는 칠판이 또 하나 있고 문이 있어요.그리고 교실 뒷 쪽에는 벽이 있어요.
교실 안에는 책상과 의자가 많아요.책상 위에 책하고 신문이 있어요.책 중에는 불어 책도 있고 스페인말 책도 있어요.그런데 한국말 책은 없군요!신문은 미국 신문만 있어요.다른 나라 신문은 없어요.
칠판과 책상 사이에는 큰 테이블이 있어요.테이블 위에 무엇이 있지오?여러 가지 사전이 있지오.영한사전도 있고 한영사전도 있고 국어사전도 있어요.그리고 옥편도 있어요.
그런데 교실에 컴퓨터도 있나요?아니오.컴퓨터는 하나도 없어요.

Ms. Kim and Mr. Park chat with each other in the instructor's lounge. Play Video

김: 박선생님,그 것이 무엇이에요?
박: 이거요?이 것은 잡지에요.
김: 미국 잡지예요,한국 잡지예요?
박: 미국 잡지예요.아, 십자말풀이가 있군요!
혹시 연필이 있으세요?
김: 아니오,없는데요.볼펜은 어떠세요?
박: 괜찮아요.
김: 파란 것하고 빨간 것이 있는데요.
박: 검은 것이 있으세요?
김: 잠깐만요...네,있어요.
박: 그럼 좀 빌려주실래요?
김: 네,여기 있어요.
(a few moments later...)
김: 십자말풀이 어떠세요?
박: 참 어렵네요! 영한사전이 있으세요
김: 아니오,없는데요한영사전은 어떠세요?
박: 괜찮아요.좀 빌려주실래요?
김: 네,여기 있어요.
박: 고맙습니다.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Links to additional lessons: adjectives


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
제 오과 -- 제 5 과 -- Unit Five
우리 교실 -- Our Classroom

Ms. Kim tells you about the classroom in which she teaches Korean. Play Video

여기는 우리 교실이에요교실 쪽에 칠판이 있어요그리고 교실 오른 쪽에는 창문이 있어요작은 창문이지오 쪽에는 칠판이 또 하나 있고 문이 있어요그리고 교실 뒷 쪽에는 벽이 있어요
교실 안에는 책상과 의자가 많아요책상 위에 책하고 신문이 있어요책 중에는 불어 책도 있고 스페인말 책도 있어요그런데 한국말 책은 없군요신문은 미국 신문만 있어요다른 나라 신문은 없어요
칠판과 책상 사이에는 테이블이 있어요테이블 위에 무엇이 있지오여러 가지 사전이 있지오영한사전도 있고 한영사전도 있고 국어사전도 있어요그리고 옥편도 있어요
그런데 교실에 컴퓨터도 있나요아니오컴퓨터는 하나도 없어요

Ms. Kim and Mr. Park chat with each other in the instructor's lounge. Play Video

김: 박선생님 것이 무엇이에요
박: 이거요 것은 잡지에요
김: 미국 잡지예요한국 잡지예요
박: 미국 잡지예요십자말풀이가 있군요
혹시 연필이 있으세요
김: 아니오없는데요볼펜은 어떠세요
박: 괜찮아요
김: 파란 것하고 빨간 것이 있는데요
박: 검은 것이 있으세요
김: 잠깐만요...있어요
박: 그럼 빌려주실래요
김: 여기 있어요
(a few moments later...)
김: 십자말풀이 어떠세요
박: 어렵네요영한사전이 있으세요
김: 아니오없는데요한영사전은 어떠세요
박: 괜찮아요 빌려주실래요
김: 여기 있어요
박: 고맙습니다

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Links to additional lessons: adjectives


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 오과 -- 제 5 과 -- Unit Five
우리 교실 -- Our Classroom

Ms. Kim tells you about the classroom in which she teaches Korean. Play Video

여기는 우리 교실이에요.교실 앞 쪽에 칠판이 있어요.그리고 교실 오른 쪽에는 창문이 있어요.작은 창문이지오?왼 쪽에는 칠판이 또 하나 있고 문이 있어요.그리고 교실 뒷 쪽에는 벽이 있어요.
교실 안에는 책상과 의자가 많아요.책상 위에 책하고 신문이 있어요.책 중에는 불어 책도 있고 스페인말 책도 있어요.그런데 한국말 책은 없군요!신문은 미국 신문만 있어요.다른 나라 신문은 없어요.
칠판과 책상 사이에는 큰 테이블이 있어요.테이블 위에 무엇이 있지오?여러 가지 사전이 있지오.영한사전도 있고 한영사전도 있고 국어사전도 있어요.그리고 옥편도 있어요.
그런데 교실에 컴퓨터도 있나요?아니오.컴퓨터는 하나도 없어요.

Ms. Kim and Mr. Park chat with each other in the instructor's lounge. Play Video

김: 박선생님,그 것이 무엇이에요?
박: 이거요?이 것은 잡지에요.
김: 미국 잡지예요,한국 잡지예요?
박: 미국 잡지예요.아, 십자말풀이가 있군요!
혹시 연필이 있으세요?
김: 아니오,없는데요.볼펜은 어떠세요?
박: 괜찮아요.
김: 파란 것하고 빨간 것이 있는데요.
박: 검은 것이 있으세요?
김: 잠깐만요...네,있어요.
박: 그럼 좀 빌려주실래요?
김: 네,여기 있어요.
(a few moments later...)
김: 십자말풀이 어떠세요?
박: 참 어렵네요! 영한사전이 있으세요
김: 아니오,없는데요한영사전은 어떠세요?
박: 괜찮아요.좀 빌려주실래요?
김: 네,여기 있어요.
박: 고맙습니다.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Links to additional lessons: adjectives


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com