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제 사과 -- 제 4 과 -- Unit Four
오늘은 바빠요 -- Today I'm Busy

Mr. Park tells you about his weekly schedule. Play Video

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안녕하세요?
요즘 바쁘세요?
저는 요즘 아주 바빠요.
날마다 영어를 가르쳐요.
영어1 영어
The word 영어 is a special sort of compound.

The first syllable (영) is the first part of the word meaning "England": 영국. 영 by itself comes from a Chinese character meaning "flower" while 국 means "nation"--so 영국 literally means "flower country."

The second syllable (어) is a synonym for 말 "speech." In fact, one can refer to the Korean language as either 한국말 -or- 한국어. The Japanese language is interchangegably 일본말 -or- 일본어. However the English language is *NOT* refered to as 영말! Only 영어 is acceptable.

Some Koreans refer to the English language as spoken in the United States (i.e. American English) as 미국말, where means 미국 "United States" (literally "beautiful country"). So how would you say "I'm an American" in Korean? --> 저는 미국 사람이에요.
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회화2
The particle 를 indicates that the preceding noun is the direct object of the sentence. In this particular case, the direct object is 영어회화 "English conversation." (What does Mr. Park teach? He teaches English conversation.)

Like the subject marker (-이/-가) and the topic marker (-은/-는), the direct object marker comes in two forms:
> When the direct object ends in a consonant, add 을...
문학을 가르쳐요. "(I) teach literature"
> When the direct object ends in a vowel, add 를...
영어를 가르쳐요. "(I) teach English"

Notice that in English, the direct object FOLLOWS the verb but in Korean, the direct object PRECEDES the verb. In most cases, you'll find the direct object between the subject (or topic) and the verb, provided that the subject (or topic) is overtly stated. Note that in these sentences, however, there is no overt subject!
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가르치지오3 가르치지오
This verb, 가르쳐요, is made up of three elements:

가르치 + 어 + 요
root ('teach') + linking vowel + politeness marker

In this case, the combination 치 + 어 is contracted to form 쳐.

What is most critical at this point is being able to identify the root. Why? Because knowing the root allows you to construct the infinitive form (also known as the 'dictionary form' or the 'citation form') of the verb. To construct the dictionary form, add -다 to the root:

가르치다 = 'to teach'

This is how you will look up verbs in a Korean dictionary!

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그리고 영문학도 가르쳐요4 영문학도 가르쳐요
As was seen in Lesson 1, the particle -도 means "also, too." It is attached only to nouns and it REPLACES the expected noun particle. In this case, the expected particle would be -을,marking the work "English literature" as the direct object. Compare the difference:

영문학을 가르쳐요 "(I) teach English lit."
> versus <
영문학도 가르쳐요 "(I) also teach English lit." -or-
"(I) teach English lit, too."
(i.e. in addition to conversation)

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월요일에는5 월요일에는
The particle -에, when attached to a time word, means "on, at":

월요일 = "Monday" > 월요일에 = "on Monday(s)"
주말 = "weekend" > 주말에 = "on (the) weekend(s)"

You'll be happy to know that the particle -에 never alters its shape!
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회화수업이 있어요6 있어요
The verb 있어요 is among the most important and widely used in Korean. It literally means "exist(s)" but is often translated into English using terms such as "there is" or "I have." Consider the sentence we're looking at right now: 월요일에 회화수업이 있어요. Word for word we could translate the sentence as follows:
월요일-에 회화 . 수업 - 이 있어요
Monday - on conversation.class-SUBJECT exists

In more colloquial English we could say either:
"There are conversation classes on Monday(s)." -or-
"On Monday(s) I have conversation classes."

The entity that exists (i.e. the conversation class) appears with the subject marker attached to it. Other examples of 있어요 (dictionary form = 있다) are given below:

책이 있어요? "Do you have a book?"
수미는 책이 있어요. "Sumi has a book."
시간이 있어요. "There's time (to do something)."

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수요일에도 회화수업이 있어요.
문학수업은 화요일 하고7 하고
The particle -하고, meaning "and," is used to connect two NOUNS. It can never be used to connect verbs. When used to connect A and B, -하고 is attached to the first noun (A); the second noun (B) takes an appropriate particle which serves to indicate if the pair of nouns is acting as a subject, topic, direct object, etc.

책하고 신문이 있어요. "I have a book and a newspaper."
수미하고 인호가 있어요."Sumi and Inho are here."
문학수업은 화요일하고 목요일에 있어요.
"As for literature classes, they are on Tuesdays and Thursdays."
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목요일에 있어요.
그러나 금요일에는 영어수업이 없어요8 없어요
The verb 없어요 (dictionary form = 없다) means "not exist"; it is the opposite of 있어요.

책이 있어요. "I have a book" -or-
"There's a book (here)."

책이 없어요. "I don't have a book" -or-
"There's no book (here)."

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그래서 일본말을 공부해요9 공부해요
The verb 공부해요 is a compound made up of two elements:

공부, a noun meaning 'study' -and-
해요, a verb meaning 'do' or 'make.'

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주중에 아주 바빠요.틈이 없어요.
그러나 주말에는 시간이 있어요.

Mr. Park enters the room where Ms. Kim is working and says: Play Video

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Mr. Park: 김선생님, 안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.박선생님, 안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 오늘은 바쁘세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,아주 바빠요.한국말수업이 있어요.
Mr. Park: 아, 그래요?매일 가르치세요10 가르치세요
Three elements:
가르치 + 세 + 요
root ('teach') + honorific + polite ending

Notice that Mr. Park inserts the honorific marker 세 when asking Ms. Kim if she teaches every day; he's showing respect.

Note, however, that in her reply, Ms. Kim OMITS the honorific element 세, as it is inappropriate to speak of oneself in such a manner.
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Ms. Kim: 네,매일 가르쳐요.
박선생님도 매일 가르치세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 금요일에는 수업이 없어요.
Ms. Kim: 그럼 금요일에는 무엇11 무엇
The word 무엇, meaning "what," behaves as any regular noun in Korean. This means that 무엇 may have attached to it any number of particles, typically the subject marker or the direct object marker. In this case, 무엇 functions as a direct object -- Ms. Kim asks "What do you do?"

무엇을 하세요? "What do you do?"

Unlike English, however, 무엇 will not always occur at the beginning of the sentence. When 무엇 functions as the subject, it should appear with the subject marker and in the subject position:

수미는 무엇이 있어요? "What does Sumi have?"
(literally: "As for Sumi, what exists?")
수미는 무엇을 해요? "What is Sumi doing?"
(literally: "As for Sumi, what does?")
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하세요12 하세요
Note this verb's three elements:
하 + 세 + 요
root ('do') + honorific + polite ending

The dictionary form for this verb is 하다.
The non-honorific polite form for 하다 is irregular: 해요.

The verb 하다, like 있다,is *very* common in Korean, and appears in a wide range of constructions and compounds (e.g. 공부하다 'to study').
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? 쉬세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 일본말을 공부해요.
Ms. Kim: 일본말 잘 하세요?13 일본말 잘 하세요?
In this situation, the verb 하다 is used to mean 'speak':
일본말 잘 하세요?
Japanese well do?
"Do you speak Japanese well?"

영어 하세요? "Do you speak English?"
한국말 하세요? "Do you speak Korean?"

Note that in each of these cases, the direct object marker -을/-를 has been omitted. Dropping noun suffixes happens quite often in Korean, particularly (1) when the relationship between the noun and the verb is clear and (2) in conversational speech. Some text materials tell beginning students that they should * not * drop noun suffixes such as -를,-가,-에,-는,... until they develop a better sense as to when suffixes can be dropped and when they can't.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

Mr. Park: 아니오. 조금 해요.
김선생님은 일본말 하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네. 저도 조금 해요.
Mr. Park: 일본말은 주중에 공부하세요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오.주중에는 시간이 없어요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?14 --> What have you learned in this unit?
1. The days of the week.
2. How to describe what you do during the week.
3. Two important transitive verbs: "to teach" and "to study."
4. Use of the direct object particle -을 / -를.
5. A review of verbs regarding speaking.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

--> How can you further develop your skills?15 --> How can you further develop your skills?
- Create a weekly planner, indicating what you do each day of the week. Use a dictionary to look up at least five (5) new Korean words that are relevant to you and your life. Add these new words to your personal list -- the one you started in Unit 3. (Remember?)
- Come up with list of topics that you are interested in studying; add these to your personal list.
- Get on the World Wide Web (WWW) and search for pages about Korea and Koreans. You may need to adjust the settings on your browser to allow you to view hangul script. See how many words you can recognize!
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.16 --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Learning exactly when and how to use particles and when to drop them (in particular the particle -은 / -는) can be tricky and, quite frankly, frustrating for Korean learners. While many books may attempt to provide you with hard-and-fast rules, real-live language is not * nearly * so neat and tidy. Research in second language learning indicates that some aspects of learning are more naturally learned "implicitly"--by observation and "absorption." Implicitly-oriented learning can be frustrating for adult language learners, who often prefer "explicit" instruction and guidance. The best advice? Keep and open mind about the learning process and be prepared to learn * both * ways: implicitly and explicitly.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

Additional lessons: days of the week days of the week
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verb forms verb forms
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We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

 

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  1. 영어

    The word 영어 is a special sort of compound.

    The first syllable (영) is the first part of the word meaning "England": 영국. 영 by itself comes from a Chinese character meaning "flower" while 국 means "nation"--so 영국 literally means "flower country."

    The second syllable (어) is a synonym for 말 "speech." In fact, one can refer to the Korean language as either 한국말 -or- 한국어. The Japanese language is interchangegably 일본말 -or- 일본어. However the English language is *NOT* refered to as 영말! Only 영어 is acceptable.

    Some Koreans refer to the English language as spoken in the United States (i.e. American English) as 미국말, where means 미국 "United States" (literally "beautiful country"). So how would you say "I'm an American" in Korean? --> 저는 미국 사람이에요.

  2. The particle 를 indicates that the preceding noun is the direct object of the sentence. In this particular case, the direct object is 영어회화 "English conversation." (What does Mr. Park teach? He teaches English conversation.)

    Like the subject marker (-이/-가) and the topic marker (-은/-는), the direct object marker comes in two forms:
    > When the direct object ends in a consonant, add 을...
    문학을 가르쳐요. "(I) teach literature"
    > When the direct object ends in a vowel, add 를...
    영어를 가르쳐요. "(I) teach English"

    Notice that in English, the direct object FOLLOWS the verb but in Korean, the direct object PRECEDES the verb. In most cases, you'll find the direct object between the subject (or topic) and the verb, provided that the subject (or topic) is overtly stated. Note that in these sentences, however, there is no overt subject!

  3. 가르치지오

    This verb, 가르쳐요, is made up of three elements:

    가르치 + 어 + 요
    root ('teach') + linking vowel + politeness marker

    In this case, the combination 치 + 어 is contracted to form 쳐.

    What is most critical at this point is being able to identify the root. Why? Because knowing the root allows you to construct the infinitive form (also known as the 'dictionary form' or the 'citation form') of the verb. To construct the dictionary form, add -다 to the root:

    가르치다 = 'to teach'

    This is how you will look up verbs in a Korean dictionary!

  4. 영문학도 가르쳐요

    As was seen in Lesson 1, the particle -도 means "also, too." It is attached only to nouns and it REPLACES the expected noun particle. In this case, the expected particle would be -을,marking the work "English literature" as the direct object. Compare the difference:

    영문학을 가르쳐요 "(I) teach English lit."
    > versus <
    영문학도 가르쳐요 "(I) also teach English lit." -or-
    "(I) teach English lit, too."
    (i.e. in addition to conversation)

  5. 월요일에는

    The particle -에, when attached to a time word, means "on, at":

    월요일 = "Monday" > 월요일에 = "on Monday(s)"
    주말 = "weekend" > 주말에 = "on (the) weekend(s)"

    You'll be happy to know that the particle -에 never alters its shape!

  6. 있어요

    The verb 있어요 is among the most important and widely used in Korean. It literally means "exist(s)" but is often translated into English using terms such as "there is" or "I have." Consider the sentence we're looking at right now: 월요일에 회화수업이 있어요. Word for word we could translate the sentence as follows:
    월요일-에 회화 . 수업 - 이 있어요
    Monday - on conversation.class-SUBJECT exists

    In more colloquial English we could say either:
    "There are conversation classes on Monday(s)." -or-
    "On Monday(s) I have conversation classes."

    The entity that exists (i.e. the conversation class) appears with the subject marker attached to it. Other examples of 있어요 (dictionary form = 있다) are given below:

    책이 있어요? "Do you have a book?"
    수미는 책이 있어요. "Sumi has a book."
    시간이 있어요. "There's time (to do something)."

  7. 하고

    The particle -하고, meaning "and," is used to connect two NOUNS. It can never be used to connect verbs. When used to connect A and B, -하고 is attached to the first noun (A); the second noun (B) takes an appropriate particle which serves to indicate if the pair of nouns is acting as a subject, topic, direct object, etc.

    책하고 신문이 있어요. "I have a book and a newspaper."
    수미하고 인호가 있어요."Sumi and Inho are here."
    문학수업은 화요일하고 목요일에 있어요.
    "As for literature classes, they are on Tuesdays and Thursdays."

  8. 없어요

    The verb 없어요 (dictionary form = 없다) means "not exist"; it is the opposite of 있어요.

    책이 있어요. "I have a book" -or-
    "There's a book (here)."

    책이 없어요. "I don't have a book" -or-
    "There's no book (here)."

  9. 공부해요

    The verb 공부해요 is a compound made up of two elements:

    공부, a noun meaning 'study' -and-
    해요, a verb meaning 'do' or 'make.'

  10. 가르치세요

    Three elements:
    가르치 + 세 + 요
    root ('teach') + honorific + polite ending

    Notice that Mr. Park inserts the honorific marker 세 when asking Ms. Kim if she teaches every day; he's showing respect.

    Note, however, that in her reply, Ms. Kim OMITS the honorific element 세, as it is inappropriate to speak of oneself in such a manner.

  11. 무엇

    The word 무엇, meaning "what," behaves as any regular noun in Korean. This means that 무엇 may have attached to it any number of particles, typically the subject marker or the direct object marker. In this case, 무엇 functions as a direct object -- Ms. Kim asks "What do you do?"

    무엇을 하세요? "What do you do?"

    Unlike English, however, 무엇 will not always occur at the beginning of the sentence. When 무엇 functions as the subject, it should appear with the subject marker and in the subject position:

    수미는 무엇이 있어요? "What does Sumi have?"
    (literally: "As for Sumi, what exists?")
    수미는 무엇을 해요? "What is Sumi doing?"
    (literally: "As for Sumi, what does?")

  12. 하세요

    Note this verb's three elements:
    하 + 세 + 요
    root ('do') + honorific + polite ending

    The dictionary form for this verb is 하다.
    The non-honorific polite form for 하다 is irregular: 해요.

    The verb 하다, like 있다,is *very* common in Korean, and appears in a wide range of constructions and compounds (e.g. 공부하다 'to study').

  13. 일본말 잘 하세요?

    In this situation, the verb 하다 is used to mean 'speak':
    일본말 잘 하세요?
    Japanese well do?
    "Do you speak Japanese well?"

    영어 하세요? "Do you speak English?"
    한국말 하세요? "Do you speak Korean?"

    Note that in each of these cases, the direct object marker -을/-를 has been omitted. Dropping noun suffixes happens quite often in Korean, particularly (1) when the relationship between the noun and the verb is clear and (2) in conversational speech. Some text materials tell beginning students that they should * not * drop noun suffixes such as -를,-가,-에,-는,... until they develop a better sense as to when suffixes can be dropped and when they can't.

  14. --> What have you learned in this unit?

    1. The days of the week.
    2. How to describe what you do during the week.
    3. Two important transitive verbs: "to teach" and "to study."
    4. Use of the direct object particle -을 / -를.
    5. A review of verbs regarding speaking.

  15. --> How can you further develop your skills?

    - Create a weekly planner, indicating what you do each day of the week. Use a dictionary to look up at least five (5) new Korean words that are relevant to you and your life. Add these new words to your personal list -- the one you started in Unit 3. (Remember?)
    - Come up with list of topics that you are interested in studying; add these to your personal list.
    - Get on the World Wide Web (WWW) and search for pages about Korea and Koreans. You may need to adjust the settings on your browser to allow you to view hangul script. See how many words you can recognize!

  16. --> A tip regarding foreign language learning.

    Learning exactly when and how to use particles and when to drop them (in particular the particle -은 / -는) can be tricky and, quite frankly, frustrating for Korean learners. While many books may attempt to provide you with hard-and-fast rules, real-live language is not * nearly * so neat and tidy. Research in second language learning indicates that some aspects of learning are more naturally learned "implicitly"--by observation and "absorption." Implicitly-oriented learning can be frustrating for adult language learners, who often prefer "explicit" instruction and guidance. The best advice? Keep and open mind about the learning process and be prepared to learn * both * ways: implicitly and explicitly.

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Korean: Word View, click below to listen
제 사과 -- 제 4 과 -- Unit Four
오늘은 바빠요 -- Today I'm Busy

Mr. Park tells you about his weekly schedule. Play Video

안녕하세요
요즘 바쁘세요
저는 요즘 아주 바빠요
날마다 영어를 가르쳐요
영어회화를 가르치지오
그리고 영문학도 가르쳐요
월요일에는 회화수업이 있어요
수요일에도 회화수업이 있어요
문학수업은 화요일하고 목요일에 있어요
그러나 금요일에는 영어수업이 없어요
그래서 일본말을 공부해요
주중에 아주 바빠요틈이 없어요
그러나 주말에는 시간이 있어요

Mr. Park enters the room where Ms. Kim is working and says: Play Video

Mr. Park: 김선생님안녕하세요
Ms. Kim: 박선생님안녕하세요
Mr. Park: 오늘은 바쁘세요
Ms. Kim: 아주 바빠요한국말수업이 있어요
Mr. Park: 그래요매일 가르치세요
Ms. Kim: 매일 가르쳐요
박선생님도 매일 가르치세요
Mr. Park: 아니오금요일에는 수업이 없어요
Ms. Kim: 그럼 금요일에는 무엇을 하세요 쉬세요
Mr. Park: 아니오일본말을 공부해요
Ms. Kim: 일본말 하세요
Mr. Park: 아니오조금 해요
김선생님은 일본말 하세요
Ms. Kim: 저도 조금 해요
Mr. Park: 일본말은 주중에 공부하세요
Ms. Kim: 아니오주중에는 시간이 없어요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: days of the week verb forms


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Korean: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 사과 -- 제 4 과 -- Unit Four
오늘은 바빠요 -- Today I'm Busy

Mr. Park tells you about his weekly schedule. Play Video

안녕하세요?
요즘 바쁘세요?
저는 요즘 아주 바빠요.
날마다 영어를 가르쳐요.
영어회화를 가르치지오.
그리고 영문학도 가르쳐요.
월요일에는 회화수업이 있어요.
수요일에도 회화수업이 있어요.
문학수업은 화요일하고 목요일에 있어요.
그러나 금요일에는 영어수업이 없어요.
그래서 일본말을 공부해요.
주중에 아주 바빠요.틈이 없어요.
그러나 주말에는 시간이 있어요.

Mr. Park enters the room where Ms. Kim is working and says: Play Video

Mr. Park: 김선생님, 안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.박선생님, 안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 오늘은 바쁘세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,아주 바빠요.한국말수업이 있어요.
Mr. Park: 아, 그래요?매일 가르치세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,매일 가르쳐요.
박선생님도 매일 가르치세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 금요일에는 수업이 없어요.
Ms. Kim: 그럼 금요일에는 무엇을 하세요? 쉬세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 일본말을 공부해요.
Ms. Kim: 일본말 잘 하세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 조금 해요.
김선생님은 일본말 하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네. 저도 조금 해요.
Mr. Park: 일본말은 주중에 공부하세요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오.주중에는 시간이 없어요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: days of the week verb forms


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
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Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
제 사과 -- 제 4 과 -- Unit Four
오늘은 바빠요 -- Today I'm Busy

Mr. Park tells you about his weekly schedule. Play Video

안녕하세요
요즘 바쁘세요
저는 요즘 아주 바빠요
날마다 영어를 가르쳐요
영어회화를 가르치지오
그리고 영문학도 가르쳐요
월요일에는 회화수업이 있어요
수요일에도 회화수업이 있어요
문학수업은 화요일하고 목요일에 있어요
그러나 금요일에는 영어수업이 없어요
그래서 일본말을 공부해요
주중에 아주 바빠요틈이 없어요
그러나 주말에는 시간이 있어요

Mr. Park enters the room where Ms. Kim is working and says: Play Video

Mr. Park: 김선생님안녕하세요
Ms. Kim: 박선생님안녕하세요
Mr. Park: 오늘은 바쁘세요
Ms. Kim: 아주 바빠요한국말수업이 있어요
Mr. Park: 그래요매일 가르치세요
Ms. Kim: 매일 가르쳐요
박선생님도 매일 가르치세요
Mr. Park: 아니오금요일에는 수업이 없어요
Ms. Kim: 그럼 금요일에는 무엇을 하세요 쉬세요
Mr. Park: 아니오일본말을 공부해요
Ms. Kim: 일본말 하세요
Mr. Park: 아니오조금 해요
김선생님은 일본말 하세요
Ms. Kim: 저도 조금 해요
Mr. Park: 일본말은 주중에 공부하세요
Ms. Kim: 아니오주중에는 시간이 없어요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: days of the week verb forms


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 사과 -- 제 4 과 -- Unit Four
오늘은 바빠요 -- Today I'm Busy

Mr. Park tells you about his weekly schedule. Play Video

안녕하세요?
요즘 바쁘세요?
저는 요즘 아주 바빠요.
날마다 영어를 가르쳐요.
영어회화를 가르치지오.
그리고 영문학도 가르쳐요.
월요일에는 회화수업이 있어요.
수요일에도 회화수업이 있어요.
문학수업은 화요일하고 목요일에 있어요.
그러나 금요일에는 영어수업이 없어요.
그래서 일본말을 공부해요.
주중에 아주 바빠요.틈이 없어요.
그러나 주말에는 시간이 있어요.

Mr. Park enters the room where Ms. Kim is working and says: Play Video

Mr. Park: 김선생님, 안녕하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네.박선생님, 안녕하세요?
Mr. Park: 오늘은 바쁘세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,아주 바빠요.한국말수업이 있어요.
Mr. Park: 아, 그래요?매일 가르치세요?
Ms. Kim: 네,매일 가르쳐요.
박선생님도 매일 가르치세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 금요일에는 수업이 없어요.
Ms. Kim: 그럼 금요일에는 무엇을 하세요? 쉬세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 일본말을 공부해요.
Ms. Kim: 일본말 잘 하세요?
Mr. Park: 아니오. 조금 해요.
김선생님은 일본말 하세요?
Ms. Kim: 네. 저도 조금 해요.
Mr. Park: 일본말은 주중에 공부하세요?
Ms. Kim: 아니오.주중에는 시간이 없어요.

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?
--> A tip regarding foreign language learning.
Additional lessons: days of the week verb forms


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com