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제 일과 -- 제 1 과 -- Unit One
첫마디 - First Words

In this unit, you will learn about thirty phrases that you should find useful throughout your career as a Korean language learner. The primary intent of this lesson is to provide you with some important basic tools for interacting with Korean speakers; as such, there is very little discussion of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Instead, the focus is placed on learning when to use each phrase appropriately.
As you work through Unit 1, pay close attention to speaking each utterance as fluently as possible. In addition, you should commit each phrase to memory.
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1
In many contexts, the Korean word 네 can be translated as "yes." It is also used to acknowledge what a speaker has just said or as a conversational filler word that carries a meaning such as "I see" or "uh-huh" or "I agree."

In more formal speech, 네 "ne" is often pronounced 예 "ye."
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. (예.)
아니오.

안녕하세요? / 안녕하십니까?2 안녕하세요? / 안녕하십니까?
A very common greeting, appropriate to most situations. Note that it is technically a question (literally "Are you at peace?") but is uttered more as if it were a statement, much like English "hello." The appropriate response is 네 "yes (I'm at peace)."

You have been given two variations for this phrase:
안녕하세요?
-and- 안녕하십니까?
Both forms are reasonably formal ways to greet somebody, but the first form (ending in -요 "-yo") is considered somewhat *less* formal than the second.
You will hear both quite frequently.
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안녕히 가세요./ 안녕히 가십시오.3 안녕히 가세요./ 안녕히 가십시오.
안녕히 가세요 literally means "go in peace"; it is used to say "goodbye" to somebody who is departing. Compare this to 안녕히 계세요(in the next line), which means "stay in peace" and is said to somebody who is staying behind. The appropriate response to either phrase is either 네 or nothing.

Note: If both parties are about to leave the place where the conversation has taken place, both say 안녕히 가세요 to each other.

As with "hello," you have been given two variations for this phrase:
안녕히 가세요. (less formal)
- and - 안녕히 가십시오. (more formal)
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안녕히 계세요./ 안녕히 계십시오.4 안녕히 계세요./ 안녕히 계십시오.
Note carefully the difference between...

가세요 / 가십시오 "go"
-and- 계세요 / 계십시오 "stay/exist"

The vowel in the first syllable makes all the difference in the world!

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감사합니다. / 고맙습니다.5 감사합니다. / 고맙습니다.
The two forms for "thank you" are given in their more formal variants (namely, those ending with -니다). There *are* corresponding variants (ending in -요) that are somewhat less formal, but you are much more likely to hear the more formal variants provided.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

천만에요. 6 천만에요.
While 천만에요 can be used to say "you're welcome," it is perhaps more common that Koreans will respond to "thank you" by either saying 네 or by nodding once. Any of these three possible responses--천만에요, 네, or nodding--are polite--and appropriate--acknowledgements of gratitude.
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실례합니다.7 실례합니다.
Used to beg a person's pardon *before* you commit an inconvenience (not after you have already done so). Perhaps best thought of in terms of "I'm about to commit a rudeness."
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실례지만...8 실례지만...
Use this phrase as a means of introducing any number of other phrases
(given later in this unit):
1. a question:
실례지만 시계가 있으세요?
"Excuse me but do you have a watch?"
2. a request:
실례지만 천천히 말씀 해주세요.
"Excuse me but please speak slowly."
3. an explanation:
실례지만 한국말 잘 못해요.
"Excuse me but I speak only a little Korean."
In each case, you're apologizing for the imposition you may be making on the listener.
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미안합니다. / 죄송합니다.9 미안합니다. / 죄송합니다.
Used to apologize *after* you have committed a rudeness or inconvenience. Compare with 실례합니다, which is to preface an inconvenience.
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알겠습니다.10 알겠습니다.
Notice that in this sentence (and those that follow), there is no subject word. In this case, for example, 알겠습니다 might literally be translated as "understand"; there is no word for "I," nor is there any part of the word that specifically means "I." All the same, the word is understood to convey the meaning "*I* understand *you*"... Such omission of the subject word is quite common in Korean, particularly when the context or situation indicates who is doing what (to whom).
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모르겠습니다.11 모르겠습니다.
Means "I don't know" and by extension (in many cases) "I don't understand."
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무엇이에요?12 무엇이에요?
Note that in isolation, the word meaning "what"--무엇--sounds as if it ends with a "t" sound. When combined with the verb "to be"--이에요--the final ㅅis pronounced like "sh." Also note that in colloquial Korean, this sentence "무엇이에요" is often shortened to "뭐예요."
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좀 주세요.13 좀 주세요.
In this phrase, there is no word directly corresponding to "it" or "to" or "me"; it is literally translated as "please give." While saying simply "please give" in English would be considered rude, saying 좀 주세요 in Korean is acceptable in many cases.

The advantage to such a short phrase is that you can use it in a wide range of situations; you don't need specify exactly what it is you're asking for. This use of 좀 주세요 is especially helpful when you don't know a lot of vocabulary! However if there is a specific item you're asking for, you can simply place it before 좀 주세요: X 좀 주세요 = "Please give me X."
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영어 하세요?14 영어 하세요?
As in other cases, this sentence does not have an overt subject; the meaning of "you" (as in "Do *you* speak English") is understood.

Note that the word 영어 "English" comes before the verb 하세요 "speak." This ordering of the words in Korean is typical: the verb always appears at the *end* of a simple sentence--never in the middle, never at the beginning.
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한국말 잘 못해요.
천천히 말씀 해주세요15 말씀 해주세요
This phrase contains two words:
* 말씀 is an honorific form meaning "words"
* 해주세요 is a word made up of two elements we've already seen:
해 ("speak" as in 해요) + 주세요 ("give").
Put the all parts together and you get "words speak-give" or "speak for me."

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한국말로 무엇이라고 해요?
영어로 무슨 뜻이에요?

시계가 있으세요?16 시계가 있으세요?
Use this question when you want to know the time.

The advantage to asking "Do you have a watch?"--as opposed to "What time is it?"--might not be immediately obvious, but imagine... If you asked a Korean "What time is it?" and he answered you "지금 한시에요," would you understand the answer? Probably not. But if you ask "Do you have a watch?" the natural response is to say "yes" and then SHOW YOU the watch-- which you can read in any language, right?
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좀 보여주세요.17 좀 보여주세요.
This is a handy phrase which encourages people to help you in a non-verbal fashion. For example, if you ask "Do you have a watch?" and the other person says "yes" without showing you his watch, you can then request to see it by saying 좀 보여주세요 "Please show it to me."
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얼마에요?
좀 써주세요.
화장실18 화장실
Restrooms in Korea come in two basic types: those with facilities designed for sitting and those with facilities designed for squatting. The latter type is more likely to be found in public places. Publicly accessible toilet facilities may not always be equipped with an ample supply of paper products; as such, you are advised to invest in a small packet of tissues to carry with you at all times (as is the custom with many Koreans). These packets are readily available at small shops, newsstands, etc.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson
19
This syllable, -이, is used to mark the subject of a sentence,
which in this case is 화장실 "bathroom." Korean, unlike English, routinely uses grammatical endings to the role that a noun plays in a sentence: if it's the subject, the direct object, the indirect object, etc. We'll learn more details about grammatical endings in future units.
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어디 있어요?
20
-을 indicates that the word 길 "road" is the direct object; it's what
you've lost. (Again, don't be too concerned with the details of
the grammatical structure at this stage; concentrate on acquiring the phrases as fluently as you can.)
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잃어버렸어요.
좀 도와주세요.
사람 살려!21 사람 살려!
Use this phrase only in serious emergencies. It's the equivalent of shouting "HELP!" in English.
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--> What have you learned in this unit?22 --> What have you learned in this unit?
1. Basic interactional terms: greetings, apologies, etc.
2. Ways to elicit both verbal and non-verbal information.
3. How to find the restroom--a must for anybody.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

--> How can you further develop your skills?23 --> How can you further develop your skills?
For phrases of the sort covered in this first unit, the keys to
success are MEMORIZATION and PRACTICE. You should try to make
your production and comprehension of each utterance as automatic
as possible.
If you know somebody else who is studying Korean, buddy
up and practice with each other. You should also seek out
Korean speakers who might be willing to work with you. The
collective experiences of many Korean language learners is that
native speakers of Korean are most impressed by efforts to learn
their language.
Learning a foreign language is akin to traveling in an unfamiliar place; although you can always try to make the journey on your own with a map, the savvy traveler seeks the help of a qualified and enthusiastic guide.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

 

▲ Hide Footnotes

  1. In many contexts, the Korean word 네 can be translated as "yes." It is also used to acknowledge what a speaker has just said or as a conversational filler word that carries a meaning such as "I see" or "uh-huh" or "I agree."

    In more formal speech, 네 "ne" is often pronounced 예 "ye."

  2. 안녕하세요? / 안녕하십니까?

    A very common greeting, appropriate to most situations. Note that it is technically a question (literally "Are you at peace?") but is uttered more as if it were a statement, much like English "hello." The appropriate response is 네 "yes (I'm at peace)."

    You have been given two variations for this phrase:
    안녕하세요?
    -and- 안녕하십니까?
    Both forms are reasonably formal ways to greet somebody, but the first form (ending in -요 "-yo") is considered somewhat *less* formal than the second.
    You will hear both quite frequently.

  3. 안녕히 가세요./ 안녕히 가십시오.

    안녕히 가세요 literally means "go in peace"; it is used to say "goodbye" to somebody who is departing. Compare this to 안녕히 계세요(in the next line), which means "stay in peace" and is said to somebody who is staying behind. The appropriate response to either phrase is either 네 or nothing.

    Note: If both parties are about to leave the place where the conversation has taken place, both say 안녕히 가세요 to each other.

    As with "hello," you have been given two variations for this phrase:
    안녕히 가세요. (less formal)
    - and - 안녕히 가십시오. (more formal)

  4. 안녕히 계세요./ 안녕히 계십시오.

    Note carefully the difference between...

    가세요 / 가십시오 "go"
    -and- 계세요 / 계십시오 "stay/exist"

    The vowel in the first syllable makes all the difference in the world!

  5. 감사합니다. / 고맙습니다.

    The two forms for "thank you" are given in their more formal variants (namely, those ending with -니다). There *are* corresponding variants (ending in -요) that are somewhat less formal, but you are much more likely to hear the more formal variants provided.

  6. 천만에요.

    While 천만에요 can be used to say "you're welcome," it is perhaps more common that Koreans will respond to "thank you" by either saying 네 or by nodding once. Any of these three possible responses--천만에요, 네, or nodding--are polite--and appropriate--acknowledgements of gratitude.

  7. 실례합니다.

    Used to beg a person's pardon *before* you commit an inconvenience (not after you have already done so). Perhaps best thought of in terms of "I'm about to commit a rudeness."

  8. 실례지만...

    Use this phrase as a means of introducing any number of other phrases
    (given later in this unit):
    1. a question:
    실례지만 시계가 있으세요?
    "Excuse me but do you have a watch?"
    2. a request:
    실례지만 천천히 말씀 해주세요.
    "Excuse me but please speak slowly."
    3. an explanation:
    실례지만 한국말 잘 못해요.
    "Excuse me but I speak only a little Korean."
    In each case, you're apologizing for the imposition you may be making on the listener.

  9. 미안합니다. / 죄송합니다.

    Used to apologize *after* you have committed a rudeness or inconvenience. Compare with 실례합니다, which is to preface an inconvenience.

  10. 알겠습니다.

    Notice that in this sentence (and those that follow), there is no subject word. In this case, for example, 알겠습니다 might literally be translated as "understand"; there is no word for "I," nor is there any part of the word that specifically means "I." All the same, the word is understood to convey the meaning "*I* understand *you*"... Such omission of the subject word is quite common in Korean, particularly when the context or situation indicates who is doing what (to whom).

  11. 모르겠습니다.

    Means "I don't know" and by extension (in many cases) "I don't understand."

  12. 무엇이에요?

    Note that in isolation, the word meaning "what"--무엇--sounds as if it ends with a "t" sound. When combined with the verb "to be"--이에요--the final ㅅis pronounced like "sh." Also note that in colloquial Korean, this sentence "무엇이에요" is often shortened to "뭐예요."

  13. 좀 주세요.

    In this phrase, there is no word directly corresponding to "it" or "to" or "me"; it is literally translated as "please give." While saying simply "please give" in English would be considered rude, saying 좀 주세요 in Korean is acceptable in many cases.

    The advantage to such a short phrase is that you can use it in a wide range of situations; you don't need specify exactly what it is you're asking for. This use of 좀 주세요 is especially helpful when you don't know a lot of vocabulary! However if there is a specific item you're asking for, you can simply place it before 좀 주세요: X 좀 주세요 = "Please give me X."

  14. 영어 하세요?

    As in other cases, this sentence does not have an overt subject; the meaning of "you" (as in "Do *you* speak English") is understood.

    Note that the word 영어 "English" comes before the verb 하세요 "speak." This ordering of the words in Korean is typical: the verb always appears at the *end* of a simple sentence--never in the middle, never at the beginning.

  15. 말씀 해주세요

    This phrase contains two words:
    * 말씀 is an honorific form meaning "words"
    * 해주세요 is a word made up of two elements we've already seen:
    해 ("speak" as in 해요) + 주세요 ("give").
    Put the all parts together and you get "words speak-give" or "speak for me."

  16. 시계가 있으세요?

    Use this question when you want to know the time.

    The advantage to asking "Do you have a watch?"--as opposed to "What time is it?"--might not be immediately obvious, but imagine... If you asked a Korean "What time is it?" and he answered you "지금 한시에요," would you understand the answer? Probably not. But if you ask "Do you have a watch?" the natural response is to say "yes" and then SHOW YOU the watch-- which you can read in any language, right?

  17. 좀 보여주세요.

    This is a handy phrase which encourages people to help you in a non-verbal fashion. For example, if you ask "Do you have a watch?" and the other person says "yes" without showing you his watch, you can then request to see it by saying 좀 보여주세요 "Please show it to me."

  18. 화장실

    Restrooms in Korea come in two basic types: those with facilities designed for sitting and those with facilities designed for squatting. The latter type is more likely to be found in public places. Publicly accessible toilet facilities may not always be equipped with an ample supply of paper products; as such, you are advised to invest in a small packet of tissues to carry with you at all times (as is the custom with many Koreans). These packets are readily available at small shops, newsstands, etc.

  19. This syllable, -이, is used to mark the subject of a sentence,
    which in this case is 화장실 "bathroom." Korean, unlike English, routinely uses grammatical endings to the role that a noun plays in a sentence: if it's the subject, the direct object, the indirect object, etc. We'll learn more details about grammatical endings in future units.

  20. -을 indicates that the word 길 "road" is the direct object; it's what
    you've lost. (Again, don't be too concerned with the details of
    the grammatical structure at this stage; concentrate on acquiring the phrases as fluently as you can.)

  21. 사람 살려!

    Use this phrase only in serious emergencies. It's the equivalent of shouting "HELP!" in English.

  22. --> What have you learned in this unit?

    1. Basic interactional terms: greetings, apologies, etc.
    2. Ways to elicit both verbal and non-verbal information.
    3. How to find the restroom--a must for anybody.

  23. --> How can you further develop your skills?

    For phrases of the sort covered in this first unit, the keys to
    success are MEMORIZATION and PRACTICE. You should try to make
    your production and comprehension of each utterance as automatic
    as possible.
    If you know somebody else who is studying Korean, buddy
    up and practice with each other. You should also seek out
    Korean speakers who might be willing to work with you. The
    collective experiences of many Korean language learners is that
    native speakers of Korean are most impressed by efforts to learn
    their language.
    Learning a foreign language is akin to traveling in an unfamiliar place; although you can always try to make the journey on your own with a map, the savvy traveler seeks the help of a qualified and enthusiastic guide.

Close video window

Close video window

Korean: Word View, click below to listen
제 일과 -- 제 1 과 -- Unit One
첫마디 - First Words

In this unit, you will learn about thirty phrases that you should find useful throughout your career as a Korean language learner. The primary intent of this lesson is to provide you with some important basic tools for interacting with Korean speakers; as such, there is very little discussion of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Instead, the focus is placed on learning when to use each phrase appropriately.
As you work through Unit 1, pay close attention to speaking each utterance as fluently as possible. In addition, you should commit each phrase to memory.
Play Video

Play Video


. (.)
아니오

안녕하세요? / 안녕하십니까
안녕히 가세요./ 안녕히 가십시오
안녕히 계세요./ 안녕히 계십시오

감사합니다. / 고맙습니다
천만에요
실례합니다
실례지만...
미안합니다. / 죄송합니다

알겠습니다
모르겠습니다

무엇이에요?
주세요

영어 하세요
한국말 해요
천천히 말씀 해주세요
한국말로 무엇이라고 해요
영어로 무슨 뜻이에요

시계가 있으세요
보여주세요
얼마에요
써주세요
화장실이 어디 있어요
길을 잃어버렸어요
도와주세요
사람 살려

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Korean: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 일과 -- 제 1 과 -- Unit One
첫마디 - First Words

In this unit, you will learn about thirty phrases that you should find useful throughout your career as a Korean language learner. The primary intent of this lesson is to provide you with some important basic tools for interacting with Korean speakers; as such, there is very little discussion of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Instead, the focus is placed on learning when to use each phrase appropriately.
As you work through Unit 1, pay close attention to speaking each utterance as fluently as possible. In addition, you should commit each phrase to memory.
Play Video

Play Video


네.예.
아니오.

안녕하세요? / 안녕하십니까?
안녕히 가세요./ 안녕히 가십시오.
안녕히 계세요./ 안녕히 계십시오.

감사합니다. / 고맙습니다.
천만에요.
실례합니다.
실례지만...
미안합니다. / 죄송합니다.

알겠습니다.
모르겠습니다.

무엇이에요?
좀 주세요.

영어 하세요?
한국말 잘 못해요.
천천히 말씀 해주세요.
한국말로 무엇이라고 해요?
영어로 무슨 뜻이에요?

시계가 있으세요?
좀 보여주세요.
얼마에요?
좀 써주세요.
화장실이 어디 있어요?
길을 잃어버렸어요.
좀 도와주세요.
사람 살려!

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
제 일과 -- 제 1 과 -- Unit One
첫마디 - First Words

In this unit, you will learn about thirty phrases that you should find useful throughout your career as a Korean language learner. The primary intent of this lesson is to provide you with some important basic tools for interacting with Korean speakers; as such, there is very little discussion of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Instead, the focus is placed on learning when to use each phrase appropriately.
As you work through Unit 1, pay close attention to speaking each utterance as fluently as possible. In addition, you should commit each phrase to memory.
Play Video

Play Video


. (.)
아니오

안녕하세요? / 안녕하십니까
안녕히 가세요./ 안녕히 가십시오
안녕히 계세요./ 안녕히 계십시오

감사합니다. / 고맙습니다
천만에요
실례합니다
실례지만...
미안합니다. / 죄송합니다

알겠습니다
모르겠습니다

무엇이에요?
주세요

영어 하세요
한국말 해요
천천히 말씀 해주세요
한국말로 무엇이라고 해요
영어로 무슨 뜻이에요

시계가 있으세요
보여주세요
얼마에요
써주세요
화장실이 어디 있어요
길을 잃어버렸어요
도와주세요
사람 살려

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
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Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
제 일과 -- 제 1 과 -- Unit One
첫마디 - First Words

In this unit, you will learn about thirty phrases that you should find useful throughout your career as a Korean language learner. The primary intent of this lesson is to provide you with some important basic tools for interacting with Korean speakers; as such, there is very little discussion of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Instead, the focus is placed on learning when to use each phrase appropriately.
As you work through Unit 1, pay close attention to speaking each utterance as fluently as possible. In addition, you should commit each phrase to memory.
Play Video

Play Video


네.예.
아니오.

안녕하세요? / 안녕하십니까?
안녕히 가세요./ 안녕히 가십시오.
안녕히 계세요./ 안녕히 계십시오.

감사합니다. / 고맙습니다.
천만에요.
실례합니다.
실례지만...
미안합니다. / 죄송합니다.

알겠습니다.
모르겠습니다.

무엇이에요?
좀 주세요.

영어 하세요?
한국말 잘 못해요.
천천히 말씀 해주세요.
한국말로 무엇이라고 해요?
영어로 무슨 뜻이에요?

시계가 있으세요?
좀 보여주세요.
얼마에요?
좀 써주세요.
화장실이 어디 있어요?
길을 잃어버렸어요.
좀 도와주세요.
사람 살려!

--> What have you learned in this unit?
--> How can you further develop your skills?


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com