Language Canvas Course Home   Formal/Long verb forms

You are now in Text+Footnote View, you can click on footnotes below or change to an audio view by using the buttons above Text+Footnote View, click or hover annotations below or click buttons above to listen to individual words+sentences
* * * * * Some notes on Formal Polite Verb Forms * * * * *
Among the many verb endings one can find in Korean is a set referred to here as the "formal polite" verbs (also known as it the "long" form).
Consonant-Final Verb Vowel-Final Verb
Statement -습니다 -ㅂ니다
먹습니다 "s/he eats/" 갑니다 "s/he goes."
Question -습니까 -니까
먹습니까? "does he eat?" 갑니까? "does he go?'
Command -으십시오 -십시오
먹으십시오 "eat!" 가십시오 "go!"
Let's -읍시다 -ㅂ시다
먹읍시다 "let's eat!" 갑시다 "let's go!"

A footnote on usage.1 A footnote on usage.
The formal polite verbs are used in situations that require a bit of distance between the speaker and the hearer. Circumstances under which you may hear this form being used are official conversations at an office or a school; television and radio news broadcasts; and written instructions. It's claimed by many that Korean men are more likely to use these formal polite constructions than are women, who may use the informal polite -요 form more frequently. If you listen carefully, though, you hear all speakers using a range of endings depending on who's speaking to whom, the location of the interaction, the nature of the conversation, etc.
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson
A footnote on pronunciation.2 A footnote on pronunciation.
Notice that the formal polite statement/question forms are SPELLED a bit differently than they are pronounced.
Spelled like: Pronounced like:
Statement -습니다 "sup.ni.da" "sum.ni.da"
Question -습니까 "sup.ni.kka" "sum.ni.kka"
Click outside of this box to return to the lesson

 

▲ Hide Footnotes

  1. A footnote on usage.

    The formal polite verbs are used in situations that require a bit of distance between the speaker and the hearer. Circumstances under which you may hear this form being used are official conversations at an office or a school; television and radio news broadcasts; and written instructions. It's claimed by many that Korean men are more likely to use these formal polite constructions than are women, who may use the informal polite -요 form more frequently. If you listen carefully, though, you hear all speakers using a range of endings depending on who's speaking to whom, the location of the interaction, the nature of the conversation, etc.

  2. A footnote on pronunciation.

    Notice that the formal polite statement/question forms are SPELLED a bit differently than they are pronounced.
    Spelled like: Pronounced like:
    Statement -습니다 "sup.ni.da" "sum.ni.da"
    Question -습니까 "sup.ni.kka" "sum.ni.kka"

The formal polite verbs are used in situations that require a bit of distance between the speaker and the hearer. Circumstances under which you may hear this form being used are official conversations at an office or a school; television and radio news broadcasts; and written instructions. It's claimed by many that Korean men are more likely to use these formal polite constructions than are women, who may use the informal polite -요 form more frequently. If you listen carefully, though, you hear all speakers using a range of endings depending on who's speaking to whom, the location of the interaction, the nature of the conversation, etc.
Notice that the formal polite statement/question forms are SPELLED a bit differently than they are pronounced.
Spelled like: Pronounced like:
Statement -습니다 "sup.ni.da" "sum.ni.da"
Question -습니까 "sup.ni.kka" "sum.ni.kka"

You are now in Word Audio View, you can click underlined items below to listen, or you can change to another view by using the buttons at the top of the window Korean: Word View, click below to listen
* * * * * Some notes on Formal Polite Verb Forms * * * * *
Among the many verb endings one can find in Korean is a set referred to here as the "formal polite" verbs (also known as it the "long" form).
Consonant-Final Verb Vowel-Final Verb
Statement -습니다 -ㅂ니다
먹습니다 "s/he eats/" 갑니다 "s/he goes."
Question -습니까 -니까
먹습니까? "does he eat?" 갑니까? "does he go?'
Command -으십시오 -십시오
먹으십시오 "eat!" 가십시오 "go!"
Let's -읍시다 -ㅂ시다
먹읍시다 "let's eat!" 갑시다 "let's go!"

A footnote on usage. A footnote on pronunciation.


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation, subscribe to this course today!

Copyright 1995-2019 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com


Language Canvas, LLC BBB Business ReviewFacebook Twitter