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Lesson 9: Hái Choi Síhchèuhng1 Hái Choi Síhchèuhng
Open markets are still popular throughout China. Bargaining and haggling are common and the language is lively. Many people establish relationships with particular vendors to insure better quality and price. As interesting as these markets can be to the foreigner, they can also be a little bewildering and intimidating.
As with most open markets, sellers will try to get what they can and will likely get more from the uninitiated. Nevertheless, you can use many of the same techniques as the Chinese use: get to know the prices, make friends with vendors, and stay with vendors who treat you well. Also, walk around and observe how the local people buy and the prices they pay. Sometimes it is useful to ask a shopper (away from the vendors, of course) about the going price.
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(Lòh Ōn-Nèih heuidou sàanggwó dong.) Play Video

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Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih dī sàanggwo lā.
Lòh Ōn-Nèih: Hèungjìu dímmaaih a2 dímmaaih a
A colloquial way to ask for prices on market goods (especially those that come in variable quantities): *dím maaih a?* 'how are [they sold]?' Similar to the phrase *géidò chíhn* later in this dialogue.
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?
Tàanfaan: Nàahmyéuhngjìu dihnghaih búndeihjìu3 Nàahmyéuhngjìu dihnghaih búndeihjìu
These are two types of bananas. The first type is imported from Southeast Asia, whereas the second type is local, hence the name *búndeih* 'local.'
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?
Lòh: Búndeihge.
Tàanfaan: Búndeihge sàamgobun yātgàn.
Lòh: Gódī m̀hhaih hóu leng4 m̀hhaih hóu leng
*Leng* often means 'pretty' or 'beautiful,' but also is used colloquially to mean 'of high quality.' In this latter sense it can refer to just about anything including computers, cars, watches, or food. In this sentence, *leng* is used in the negative to note the low quality of the bananas (and of course to position for a better bargain!).
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jè, gai ngóh léunggobun lā.
Tàanfaan: M̀hhóyìh gam pèhng. Sàam mān yātgàn béi néih, hóu m̀hhóu?
Lòh: Hóu la, máaih léuhnggàn. Nīdouh haih luhkmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh! Dòjeh!

(Lòh Ōn-Nèih hàahngdou sihchèuhng yahpbihn máaih yuhk.) Play Video

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Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih dī yuhk lā.
Lòh: Chéngmahn, ngàuhyuhk géidò chíhn yātgàn5 ngàuhyuhk géidò chíhn yātgàn
Cantonese allows for some flexibility in the placement of the topic. When the topic is at the beginning of an utterance, it signals definiteness---that is, there is a stated or understood referent. Since in a market it is typical to have the item in front of you, the topic is usually at the front of the utterance as it is in this sentence.


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?
Tàanfaan: Yātgàn luhkgo sàam6 luhkgo sàam
When there is no unit of money below the tenths (*houh*) involved in the transaction, one can use the number+*go* (general classifier), another number + *houh* (where houh* is optional). The *mān* 'dollar' is dropped; when just one dollar plus is involved, *yāt* is frequently deleted as well. Examples:

gochat 1.70
sāamgo sāam 3.30
seigo baat 4.80
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jē.
Lòh: Gam gwai ge, pèhng dī lā!
Tàanfaan: Yíhgìng hóu pèhng la. Joi pèhng, ngóh jauh7 jauh
*Jauh* is commonly used to mean 'then,' but also can indicate that an event is soon to take place. The first sense applies in this sentence.
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sitbún8 sitbún
This word means 'to lose [money]'. However, *sitbún* is used in this sentence mainly as a bargaining position.
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ga lā!
Lòh: Gám, ngóh m̀hmáaih la9 la
*La* signals a change in state, contrasting with the earlier interest in buying after the rejection of his price. As such, the tone of the sentence is emphatic.
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.
Tàanfaan: Hóu 10
Indicates acceptance and that the vendor is seeking common ground.
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, gai néih luhkmān yātgàn, máaih m̀hmáaih a?
Lòh: Hóu, máaih léuhng'gàn lā. Nīdouh haih sahpyihmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh. Síujé, néih jànhaih sīk saatga11 saatga
Means 'to bargain' or literally 'to kill the price.' A less colloquial way to express the idea is *góngga*, literally, 'to talk price.'
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; néih jouh sàangyi ga12 néih jouh sàangyi ga
Although the vendor is asking if Annie does business, the question is probably more polite praise than a real question. *Ga* is a contraction of the two particles *ge* denoting that 'such is the case' and *àh* denoting surprise.
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?
Lòh: M̀hhaih, ngóh haih làuhhohksàang lèih ge.
Tàanfaan: Hòihohk13 Hòihohk
Means 'to begin school,' as in starting a new term.
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meih a?
Lòh: Jauh14 Jauh
*Jauh* is commonly used to mean 'then,' but also can indicate that an event is soon to take place. The latter sense applies in this sentence.
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fai yiu hòi hohk la. Hóu, haih gam sìn15 haih gam sìn
There are a number of ways to excuse oneself from a conversation in Cantonese. One common way to do so is to simply state that the event is concluded. In this exchange Annie simply states *haih gám sìn* 'it is thus.' You can also announce that you are leaving to signal closure: *Ngóh jáu sìn* 'I will leave first.'
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.
Tàanfaan: Hóu, hahchi joi lèih bòngchan la.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson in Chinese characters This lesson in Chinese characters
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[ Conventions and Grammatical Terms16 Conventions and Grammatical Terms

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| Particles17 Particles

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| Money Samples Money Samples
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Weights &Measures Weights &Measures
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| Study Terms Study Terms
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| Shopping Vocabulary | Shopping Vocabulary
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Street Market18 Street Market

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| Photo - Venders19 Photo - Venders

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]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
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Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

 

▲ Hide Footnotes

  1. Hái Choi Síhchèuhng

    Open markets are still popular throughout China. Bargaining and haggling are common and the language is lively. Many people establish relationships with particular vendors to insure better quality and price. As interesting as these markets can be to the foreigner, they can also be a little bewildering and intimidating.
    As with most open markets, sellers will try to get what they can and will likely get more from the uninitiated. Nevertheless, you can use many of the same techniques as the Chinese use: get to know the prices, make friends with vendors, and stay with vendors who treat you well. Also, walk around and observe how the local people buy and the prices they pay. Sometimes it is useful to ask a shopper (away from the vendors, of course) about the going price.

  2. dímmaaih a

    A colloquial way to ask for prices on market goods (especially those that come in variable quantities): *dím maaih a?* 'how are [they sold]?' Similar to the phrase *géidò chíhn* later in this dialogue.

  3. Nàahmyéuhngjìu dihnghaih búndeihjìu

    These are two types of bananas. The first type is imported from Southeast Asia, whereas the second type is local, hence the name *búndeih* 'local.'

  4. m̀hhaih hóu leng

    *Leng* often means 'pretty' or 'beautiful,' but also is used colloquially to mean 'of high quality.' In this latter sense it can refer to just about anything including computers, cars, watches, or food. In this sentence, *leng* is used in the negative to note the low quality of the bananas (and of course to position for a better bargain!).

  5. ngàuhyuhk géidò chíhn yātgàn

    Cantonese allows for some flexibility in the placement of the topic. When the topic is at the beginning of an utterance, it signals definiteness---that is, there is a stated or understood referent. Since in a market it is typical to have the item in front of you, the topic is usually at the front of the utterance as it is in this sentence.


  6. luhkgo sàam

    When there is no unit of money below the tenths (*houh*) involved in the transaction, one can use the number+*go* (general classifier), another number + *houh* (where houh* is optional). The *mān* 'dollar' is dropped; when just one dollar plus is involved, *yāt* is frequently deleted as well. Examples:

    gochat 1.70
    sāamgo sāam 3.30
    seigo baat 4.80

  7. jauh

    *Jauh* is commonly used to mean 'then,' but also can indicate that an event is soon to take place. The first sense applies in this sentence.

  8. sitbún

    This word means 'to lose [money]'. However, *sitbún* is used in this sentence mainly as a bargaining position.

  9. la

    *La* signals a change in state, contrasting with the earlier interest in buying after the rejection of his price. As such, the tone of the sentence is emphatic.

  10. Indicates acceptance and that the vendor is seeking common ground.

  11. saatga

    Means 'to bargain' or literally 'to kill the price.' A less colloquial way to express the idea is *góngga*, literally, 'to talk price.'

  12. néih jouh sàangyi ga

    Although the vendor is asking if Annie does business, the question is probably more polite praise than a real question. *Ga* is a contraction of the two particles *ge* denoting that 'such is the case' and *àh* denoting surprise.

  13. Hòihohk

    Means 'to begin school,' as in starting a new term.

  14. Jauh

    *Jauh* is commonly used to mean 'then,' but also can indicate that an event is soon to take place. The latter sense applies in this sentence.

  15. haih gam sìn

    There are a number of ways to excuse oneself from a conversation in Cantonese. One common way to do so is to simply state that the event is concluded. In this exchange Annie simply states *haih gám sìn* 'it is thus.' You can also announce that you are leaving to signal closure: *Ngóh jáu sìn* 'I will leave first.'

  16. Conventions and Grammatical Terms

  17. Particles

  18. Street Market

  19. Photo - Venders

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Cantonese: Word View, click below to listen
Lesson 9: Hái Choi Síhchèuhng


(Lòh Ōn-Nèih heuidou sàanggwó dong.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih sàanggwo .
Lòh Ōn-Nèih: Hèungjìu dímmaaih a?
Tàanfaan: Nàahmyéuhngjìu dihnghaih búndeihjìu?
Lòh: Búndeihge.
Tàanfaan: Búndeihge sàamgobun yātgàn.
Lòh: Gódī m̀hhaih hóu leng , gai ngóh léunggobun .
Tàanfaan: M̀hhóyìh gam pèhng. Sàam mān yātgàn béi néih, hóu m̀hhóu?
Lòh: Hóu la, máaih léuhnggàn. Nīdouh haih luhkmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh! Dòjeh!

(Lòh Ōn-Nèih hàahngdou sihchèuhng yahpbihn máaih yuhk.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih yuhk .
Lòh: Chéngmahn, ngàuhyuhk géidò chíhn yātgàn?
Tàanfaan: Yātgàn luhkgo sàam .
Lòh: Gam gwai ge, pèhng !
Tàanfaan: Yíhgìng hóu pèhng la. Joi pèhng, ngóh jauh sitbún ga !
Lòh: Gám, ngóh m̀hmáaih la.
Tàanfaan: Hóu , gai néih luhkmān yātgàn, máaih m̀hmáaih a?
Lòh: Hóu, máaih léuhng'gàn . Nīdouh haih sahpyihmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh. Síujé, néih jànhaih sīk saatga; néih jouh sàangyi ga?
Lòh: M̀hhaih, ngóh haih làuhhohksàang lèih ge.
Tàanfaan: Hòihohk meih a?
Lòh: Jauh fai yiu hòi hohk la. Hóu, haih gam sìn.
Tàanfaan: Hóu, hahchi joi lèih bòngchan la.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson in Chinese characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Money Samples
Weights &Measures | Study Terms | Shopping Vocabulary
Street Market | Photo - Venders ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Cantonese: Sentence View, click below to listen
Lesson 9: Hái Choi Síhchèuhng


(Lòh Ōn-Nèih heuidou sàanggwó dong.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih dī sàanggwo lā.
Lòh Ōn-Nèih: Hèungjìu dímmaaih a?
Tàanfaan: Nàahmyéuhngjìu dihnghaih búndeihjìu?
Lòh: Búndeihge.
Tàanfaan: Búndeihge sàamgobun yātgàn.
Lòh: Gódī m̀hhaih hóu leng jè, gai ngóh léunggobun lā.
Tàanfaan: M̀hhóyìh gam pèhng. Sàam mān yātgàn béi néih, hóu m̀hhóu?
Lòh: Hóu la, máaih léuhnggàn. Nīdouh haih luhkmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh! Dòjeh!

(Lòh Ōn-Nèih hàahngdou sihchèuhng yahpbihn máaih yuhk.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih dī yuhk lā.
Lòh: Chéngmahn, ngàuhyuhk géidò chíhn yātgàn?
Tàanfaan: Yātgàn luhkgo sàam jē.
Lòh: Gam gwai ge, pèhng dī lā!
Tàanfaan: Yíhgìng hóu pèhng la. Joi pèhng, ngóh jauh sitbún ga lā!
Lòh: Gám, ngóh m̀hmáaih la.
Tàanfaan: Hóu lā, gai néih luhkmān yātgàn, máaih m̀hmáaih a?
Lòh: Hóu, máaih léuhng'gàn lā. Nīdouh haih sahpyihmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh. Síujé, néih jànhaih sīk saatga; néih jouh sàangyi ga?
Lòh: M̀hhaih, ngóh haih làuhhohksàang lèih ge.
Tàanfaan: Hòihohk meih a?
Lòh: Jauh fai yiu hòi hohk la. Hóu, haih gam sìn.
Tàanfaan: Hóu, hahchi joi lèih bòngchan la.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson in Chinese characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Money Samples
Weights &Measures | Study Terms | Shopping Vocabulary
Street Market | Photo - Venders ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
Lesson 9: Hái Choi Síhchèuhng


(Lòh Ōn-Nèih heuidou sàanggwó dong.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih sàanggwo .
Lòh Ōn-Nèih: Hèungjìu dímmaaih a?
Tàanfaan: Nàahmyéuhngjìu dihnghaih búndeihjìu?
Lòh: Búndeihge.
Tàanfaan: Búndeihge sàamgobun yātgàn.
Lòh: Gódī m̀hhaih hóu leng , gai ngóh léunggobun .
Tàanfaan: M̀hhóyìh gam pèhng. Sàam mān yātgàn béi néih, hóu m̀hhóu?
Lòh: Hóu la, máaih léuhnggàn. Nīdouh haih luhkmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh! Dòjeh!

(Lòh Ōn-Nèih hàahngdou sihchèuhng yahpbihn máaih yuhk.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih yuhk .
Lòh: Chéngmahn, ngàuhyuhk géidò chíhn yātgàn?
Tàanfaan: Yātgàn luhkgo sàam .
Lòh: Gam gwai ge, pèhng !
Tàanfaan: Yíhgìng hóu pèhng la. Joi pèhng, ngóh jauh sitbún ga !
Lòh: Gám, ngóh m̀hmáaih la.
Tàanfaan: Hóu , gai néih luhkmān yātgàn, máaih m̀hmáaih a?
Lòh: Hóu, máaih léuhng'gàn . Nīdouh haih sahpyihmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh. Síujé, néih jànhaih sīk saatga; néih jouh sàangyi ga?
Lòh: M̀hhaih, ngóh haih làuhhohksàang lèih ge.
Tàanfaan: Hòihohk meih a?
Lòh: Jauh fai yiu hòi hohk la. Hóu, haih gam sìn.
Tàanfaan: Hóu, hahchi joi lèih bòngchan la.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson in Chinese characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Money Samples
Weights &Measures | Study Terms | Shopping Vocabulary
Street Market | Photo - Venders ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
Lesson 9: Hái Choi Síhchèuhng


(Lòh Ōn-Nèih heuidou sàanggwó dong.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih dī sàanggwo lā.
Lòh Ōn-Nèih: Hèungjìu dímmaaih a?
Tàanfaan: Nàahmyéuhngjìu dihnghaih búndeihjìu?
Lòh: Búndeihge.
Tàanfaan: Búndeihge sàamgobun yātgàn.
Lòh: Gódī m̀hhaih hóu leng jè, gai ngóh léunggobun lā.
Tàanfaan: M̀hhóyìh gam pèhng. Sàam mān yātgàn béi néih, hóu m̀hhóu?
Lòh: Hóu la, máaih léuhnggàn. Nīdouh haih luhkmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh! Dòjeh!

(Lòh Ōn-Nèih hàahngdou sihchèuhng yahpbihn máaih yuhk.) Play Video


Tàanfaan: Jèh jé, máaih dī yuhk lā.
Lòh: Chéngmahn, ngàuhyuhk géidò chíhn yātgàn?
Tàanfaan: Yātgàn luhkgo sàam jē.
Lòh: Gam gwai ge, pèhng dī lā!
Tàanfaan: Yíhgìng hóu pèhng la. Joi pèhng, ngóh jauh sitbún ga lā!
Lòh: Gám, ngóh m̀hmáaih la.
Tàanfaan: Hóu lā, gai néih luhkmān yātgàn, máaih m̀hmáaih a?
Lòh: Hóu, máaih léuhng'gàn lā. Nīdouh haih sahpyihmān.
Tàanfaan: Dòjeh. Síujé, néih jànhaih sīk saatga; néih jouh sàangyi ga?
Lòh: M̀hhaih, ngóh haih làuhhohksàang lèih ge.
Tàanfaan: Hòihohk meih a?
Lòh: Jauh fai yiu hòi hohk la. Hóu, haih gam sìn.
Tàanfaan: Hóu, hahchi joi lèih bòngchan la.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson in Chinese characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Money Samples
Weights &Measures | Study Terms | Shopping Vocabulary
Street Market | Photo - Venders ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com