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Lesson 4: Hái Pàhngyáuh Ūkkéi Sihkfaahn


(Lòh Ōn-nèih heui Chàhn Giht-mìhng ūkkéi sihkfaahn.) Play Video

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Lòh Ōn-nèih: (Paakmùhn) Chàhn Sìnsàang1 Chàhn Sìnsàang
Note here that Annie, despite knowing Chan Git-ming well, refers to him as Mr. Chan when talking to Chan Git-Ming's wife whom she has never met.
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háidouh2 háidouh
Literally 'at-place,' this means 'in' or 'at home.'
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ma?
Chàhn Taaitáai: (Hòimùhn) Háidouh, yahplèih 3
Emphatic particle. When pronounced with a high tone as it is here, it is similar in mood to the high tone *ā*. Here *lā* indicates a strong urging by the speaker.
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!
Chàhn Gihtmìhng: Néih hóu4 Néih hóu
*Néih hóu* is a somewhat more fomal greeting, often used when first meeting a person. It is distinquished from its question form counterpart, which expects a response.
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! Yíh, Làhm Síujé m̀hlèih a5 a
A final question particle indicating surprise.
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? Faahn choi dōu jéunbeihhóu lo6 Faahn choi dōu jéunbeihhóu lo
Literally, 'the rice and vegetables are all ready'. The construction noun+ noun+*dōu*+verb is a common one in Cantonese; it implies definiteness (that is, the obect has been referred to).
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, jauh7 jauh
A structure marker with a wide range of meanings including: 'then, so, right away.' *Jauh* means 'only, just.' *Jauh* is also frequently used in the construction: *(yúhguó) ... jauh...* '(if )... then ...' where *yúhguó* is optional.
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dáng gán8 gán
The particle *-gán* can be affixed to verbs and is an imperfect aspect marker indicating that the action is seen as ongoing. Cantonese does not have tense in the usual sense (verbs marked for real time). Instead, real time is marked by time words (such as *kàhmyaht* 'yesterday,' *gàmyaht* 'today,' and * tìngyaht* 'tomorrow.')
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néihdeih jàh9 jàh
The final particle *jàh* is a contraction of two particles *je* 'just, only* and *àh* 'disapproving, surprised.' Here the disapproval is more feigned than real, a good natured chiding by a friend for being late.
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.
Lòh : M̀hhóu yisī10 M̀hhóu yisī
Literally 'bad meaning' or 'embarrassed,' *m̀hhóu yihsi* is used here as a conventional way to express appreciation and to acknowlege effort on your behalf.
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, Làhm Yèuhngjí yáuhdī sih11 yáuhdī sih
This expression and its variant *yáuh sih* literally means 'to have things or matters [to attend to].' It is a common and useful expression to indicate that you are justifiably unavailable. Typically, no further explanation is required. *-dī* here means 'some.'
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m̀hlèihdāk12 m̀hlèihdāk
Means 'not able to come' (not+come+able). This structure is a common one in Cantonese and takes the general form: *m̀h + verb + dāk*, where *dāk* indicates ability.
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.
Chàhn G.: Jàn haih hó sīk! Ngóh taaitáai hóu séung yìhngsīk kéuih. Gám, hahchi sìn13 sìn
Literally meaning 'first,' *sìn* is often used idiomatically to mean 'until,' as it does here. When used in this way, it comes at the end of the phrase or sentence. Thus, this whole
sentence is 'next+time+until,' or translated more freely 'We will have to wait until next time.'
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ne.
Lòh: Ngóh daaijódī tòhng béi néihdeih14 Ngóh daaijódī tòhng béi néihdeih
It is usual to bring a small gift when invited to dinner at a Chinese home. The type of gift varies with the situation, the social context, and one's relationship with the host. Traditionally, people often brought fruit; more recently it is common to bring a special type of sweets---often imported goods such as western chocolates. The gift should be nice but not overly extravagant, so as not to make the person lose face by offering something for which they could not reciprocate.
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.
Chàhn G.: M̀hsái gam haakhei15 M̀hsái gam haakhei
Literally, 'no need to be so polite.' The expression is another example of a person appearing to refuse hospitality, but is in reality a conventional way to show appreciation.
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!

(Kéuihdeih jéunbeih chóhdài sihkfaahn.)

Lòh: M̀hhóu yisī, màhfàahnsaai.
Chàhn G: M̀hgányiu, chéng chóh 16
Indicates a request.
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!
Chàhn T: Bihnfaahn jè17 Bihnfaahn jè
Literally meaning 'ordinary food,' *bihnfaahn* is conventionally used to show politeness and humility when a guest compliments the food. Politeness generally requires a person to deny a compliment of any sort paid to him/her or to his/her family---often by insisting the opposite. Mrs. Chan may very well have worked the entire day preparing a superb dinner, yet she will say that it is 'everyday food, so as not to appear to praise herself. Similarly, if you compliment someone's child as well-behaved or bright, a Cantonese person will often respond by saying that the child is badly behaved or a poor student. This sort of response does not mean, however, that the person does not appreciate or welcome the kind words.
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, móuh māt màhfàahn, chéng chóh lā. *18 *
The preceding few exchanges are examples of polite language in Cantonese and should not be taken too literally. The language is more polite than that in previous exchanges with Chan Git-Ming because it is a dinner invitation, and because Annie has just met Mrs. Chan.
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Lòh: Mèihdouh hóu hèung a19 a
A contraction of the two particles *ge* and *ā*, where *ge* is an affirmation marker and *ā* indicates a lively tone. It can also be pronounced with a high-rising tone.
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! Chàhn Táai20 Táai
A slightly less formal form of *taaitáai* 'Mrs.'
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, haih néih jyú ga21 haih néih jyú ga
Means 'Is it you who made it?' This is a common structure in Cantonese and takes the form: (object) +*haih*+ pronoun/name + verb+*ge*. The particle *ge* is fused with the question particle *a* to make the utterance a question. The object is often omitted when it is apparent from the context, as it is here. In the next sentence we see the object *dauhfuh* is in fact overtly stated since it is not clear from context.
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?
Chàhn: Màhpòh dauhfuh haih ngóh sìnsàang jyúge, kèihtàdī dōu haih ngóh jyú22 jyú
There are many ways to say 'to cook' in Cantonese, depending on the preparation method. *Jyú* is the most general form. Some other terms are as follows:

jíng 'to prepare' (not necessarily to apply heat, as with sushi)
já 'to deep fry'
bō 'to boil'
chàu 'to stir fry'
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ge.
Lòh: Néihdeih jùngyi mātyéh Jùnggwok choi23 choi
*Choi* literally means 'vegetable,' but like *faahn* 'rice' it can be used in a generic sense meaning 'food' or 'dish of food'. Here Annie is asking what sort of Chinese dishes the Chans especially enjoy. In the right context, she might also in fact be asking what kind of vegetables they like.
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a?
Chàhn: Ngóh jùngyi chyùn24 chyùn
Refers to the cooking of Szechwan province in China.
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choi. Ōn-nèih, néih sīk m̀hsīk jyúfaahn a25 sīk m̀hsīk jyúfaahn a
This is another use of the verb-object compound, where *faahn* 'rice' is used in the generic sense. Mr. Chan is asking Annie whether or not she knows how to cook, not specifically if she knows how to cook rice. Again, context will determine which sense is being conveyed.
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?
Lòh: M̀hhaih géi sīk. Daahnhaih Làhm Yèuhngjí hóu sīk jíng yùhsàang26 yùhsàang
Literally meaning 'fish raw,' the word refers to Japanese sushi. Mrs. Chan, taking the word literally, finds it strange that people would eat raw fish. In fact, Chinese rarely eat uncooked food, especially not fish or meat.
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.
Chàhn T: Mātyéh lèihga27 Mātyéh lèihga
The word *lèihga* (literally 'come+ FP') attached to *mātyéh* 'what' makes the question emphatic. Mrs. Chan is surprised that someone would eat raw fish (Japanese sushi).
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, yùhsaàng sihkdāk28 sihkdāk
This is a positive counterpart to the structure represented with *m̀hlèihdāk* 'not able to come' earlier in this dialogue. Here the pattern is verb + *dāk*, indicating positive ability: 'able to be eaten,' or 'edible.'
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gàh?
Lòh: Sihkdākge, hóu hóusihk29 hóusihk
Means 'good to eat' or 'tasty'. The structure good+verb/stative verb is very productive in Cantonese. Some other examples are:

*hóutēng* good+hear 'pleasant to listen to'
*hóuyám* good+drink 'tasty, pleasant to drink'
*hóutáai* good+look 'nice to look at, beautiful'
*hóuhèung* good+fragrant 'nice to smell, fragrant'

Each of these can be negated for the opposite sense as well, as in the form of *m̀h+hóu*+verb/stative verb. For example, *m̀hhóusihk* 'bad tasting.'
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tìm.
Chàhn G: Faatgwokyàhn juhng sihk tìhnlóyuhk tìm30 tìm
Emphatic particle meaning 'too' or 'even.' It often co-occurs with the adverb *juhng* 'still' as it does in this sentence.
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! Ōn-Nèih, haihm̀hhaih31 haihm̀hhaih
Means 'isn't it the case?' A general tag question using the choice question form: verb+not-verb+QFP. These tags are common in Cantonese and function much the same as they do in English. Here Chan Git-ming uses it to confirm something about which he is not sure (eating snails in France).
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a?
Lòh: Haih ā. Tèngyàhngóng32 Tèngyàhngóng
Literally, '[I] have heard people say,' or more naturally, '[I] have heard.'
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, Gwóngdùngyàhn jùngyi sihk sèh bo33 bo
Particle indicating exclamation, special consideration, or appreciation. Here *bo* solicits agreement from Chan Git-ming about whether or not Cantonese like to eat snake.
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.
Chàhn G: Ngóhdeih fuhgahn hòi34 hòi
Literally 'to open,' *hòi* is also used to mean 'begin,' 'initiate,' 'set forth,' etc.
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35
Perfect aspect particle indicating that an event is viewed as complete. Note that although perfect aspect often is set in the past, it is not the same as the past tense, which is not directly correlated with real time.
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yāt gàa36 gàa
Classifier for restaurant.
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n chàangún, góbihn37 góbihn
Literally 'that side,' *góbihn* means 'there' in this sentence. *Gó-* 'that' is a bound form (it does not occur by itself) and typically precedes a classifier.
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ge sèh hóu hóusihkge.
Lòh: Jàn'ge? Ngóh dākhaahn38 dākhaahn
Means 'to have free time.'
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heui sihah sìn.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson shown with Chinese Characters This lesson shown with Chinese Characters
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[ Conventions and Grammatical Terms39 Conventions and Grammatical Terms

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| Particles40 Particles

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| Food Terms: Romanized Romanized
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/ Chinese Chinese
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]


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▲ Hide Footnotes

  1. Chàhn Sìnsàang

    Note here that Annie, despite knowing Chan Git-ming well, refers to him as Mr. Chan when talking to Chan Git-Ming's wife whom she has never met.

  2. háidouh

    Literally 'at-place,' this means 'in' or 'at home.'

  3. Emphatic particle. When pronounced with a high tone as it is here, it is similar in mood to the high tone *ā*. Here *lā* indicates a strong urging by the speaker.

  4. Néih hóu

    *Néih hóu* is a somewhat more fomal greeting, often used when first meeting a person. It is distinquished from its question form counterpart, which expects a response.

  5. a

    A final question particle indicating surprise.

  6. Faahn choi dōu jéunbeihhóu lo

    Literally, 'the rice and vegetables are all ready'. The construction noun+ noun+*dōu*+verb is a common one in Cantonese; it implies definiteness (that is, the obect has been referred to).

  7. jauh

    A structure marker with a wide range of meanings including: 'then, so, right away.' *Jauh* means 'only, just.' *Jauh* is also frequently used in the construction: *(yúhguó) ... jauh...* '(if )... then ...' where *yúhguó* is optional.

  8. gán

    The particle *-gán* can be affixed to verbs and is an imperfect aspect marker indicating that the action is seen as ongoing. Cantonese does not have tense in the usual sense (verbs marked for real time). Instead, real time is marked by time words (such as *kàhmyaht* 'yesterday,' *gàmyaht* 'today,' and * tìngyaht* 'tomorrow.')

  9. jàh

    The final particle *jàh* is a contraction of two particles *je* 'just, only* and *àh* 'disapproving, surprised.' Here the disapproval is more feigned than real, a good natured chiding by a friend for being late.

  10. M̀hhóu yisī

    Literally 'bad meaning' or 'embarrassed,' *m̀hhóu yihsi* is used here as a conventional way to express appreciation and to acknowlege effort on your behalf.

  11. yáuhdī sih

    This expression and its variant *yáuh sih* literally means 'to have things or matters [to attend to].' It is a common and useful expression to indicate that you are justifiably unavailable. Typically, no further explanation is required. *-dī* here means 'some.'

  12. m̀hlèihdāk

    Means 'not able to come' (not+come+able). This structure is a common one in Cantonese and takes the general form: *m̀h + verb + dāk*, where *dāk* indicates ability.

  13. sìn

    Literally meaning 'first,' *sìn* is often used idiomatically to mean 'until,' as it does here. When used in this way, it comes at the end of the phrase or sentence. Thus, this whole
    sentence is 'next+time+until,' or translated more freely 'We will have to wait until next time.'

  14. Ngóh daaijódī tòhng béi néihdeih

    It is usual to bring a small gift when invited to dinner at a Chinese home. The type of gift varies with the situation, the social context, and one's relationship with the host. Traditionally, people often brought fruit; more recently it is common to bring a special type of sweets---often imported goods such as western chocolates. The gift should be nice but not overly extravagant, so as not to make the person lose face by offering something for which they could not reciprocate.

  15. M̀hsái gam haakhei

    Literally, 'no need to be so polite.' The expression is another example of a person appearing to refuse hospitality, but is in reality a conventional way to show appreciation.

  16. Indicates a request.

  17. Bihnfaahn jè

    Literally meaning 'ordinary food,' *bihnfaahn* is conventionally used to show politeness and humility when a guest compliments the food. Politeness generally requires a person to deny a compliment of any sort paid to him/her or to his/her family---often by insisting the opposite. Mrs. Chan may very well have worked the entire day preparing a superb dinner, yet she will say that it is 'everyday food, so as not to appear to praise herself. Similarly, if you compliment someone's child as well-behaved or bright, a Cantonese person will often respond by saying that the child is badly behaved or a poor student. This sort of response does not mean, however, that the person does not appreciate or welcome the kind words.

  18. *

    The preceding few exchanges are examples of polite language in Cantonese and should not be taken too literally. The language is more polite than that in previous exchanges with Chan Git-Ming because it is a dinner invitation, and because Annie has just met Mrs. Chan.

  19. a

    A contraction of the two particles *ge* and *ā*, where *ge* is an affirmation marker and *ā* indicates a lively tone. It can also be pronounced with a high-rising tone.

  20. Táai

    A slightly less formal form of *taaitáai* 'Mrs.'

  21. haih néih jyú ga

    Means 'Is it you who made it?' This is a common structure in Cantonese and takes the form: (object) +*haih*+ pronoun/name + verb+*ge*. The particle *ge* is fused with the question particle *a* to make the utterance a question. The object is often omitted when it is apparent from the context, as it is here. In the next sentence we see the object *dauhfuh* is in fact overtly stated since it is not clear from context.

  22. jyú

    There are many ways to say 'to cook' in Cantonese, depending on the preparation method. *Jyú* is the most general form. Some other terms are as follows:

    jíng 'to prepare' (not necessarily to apply heat, as with sushi)
    já 'to deep fry'
    bō 'to boil'
    chàu 'to stir fry'

  23. choi

    *Choi* literally means 'vegetable,' but like *faahn* 'rice' it can be used in a generic sense meaning 'food' or 'dish of food'. Here Annie is asking what sort of Chinese dishes the Chans especially enjoy. In the right context, she might also in fact be asking what kind of vegetables they like.

  24. chyùn

    Refers to the cooking of Szechwan province in China.

  25. sīk m̀hsīk jyúfaahn a

    This is another use of the verb-object compound, where *faahn* 'rice' is used in the generic sense. Mr. Chan is asking Annie whether or not she knows how to cook, not specifically if she knows how to cook rice. Again, context will determine which sense is being conveyed.

  26. yùhsàang

    Literally meaning 'fish raw,' the word refers to Japanese sushi. Mrs. Chan, taking the word literally, finds it strange that people would eat raw fish. In fact, Chinese rarely eat uncooked food, especially not fish or meat.

  27. Mātyéh lèihga

    The word *lèihga* (literally 'come+ FP') attached to *mātyéh* 'what' makes the question emphatic. Mrs. Chan is surprised that someone would eat raw fish (Japanese sushi).

  28. sihkdāk

    This is a positive counterpart to the structure represented with *m̀hlèihdāk* 'not able to come' earlier in this dialogue. Here the pattern is verb + *dāk*, indicating positive ability: 'able to be eaten,' or 'edible.'

  29. hóusihk

    Means 'good to eat' or 'tasty'. The structure good+verb/stative verb is very productive in Cantonese. Some other examples are:

    *hóutēng* good+hear 'pleasant to listen to'
    *hóuyám* good+drink 'tasty, pleasant to drink'
    *hóutáai* good+look 'nice to look at, beautiful'
    *hóuhèung* good+fragrant 'nice to smell, fragrant'

    Each of these can be negated for the opposite sense as well, as in the form of *m̀h+hóu*+verb/stative verb. For example, *m̀hhóusihk* 'bad tasting.'

  30. tìm

    Emphatic particle meaning 'too' or 'even.' It often co-occurs with the adverb *juhng* 'still' as it does in this sentence.

  31. haihm̀hhaih

    Means 'isn't it the case?' A general tag question using the choice question form: verb+not-verb+QFP. These tags are common in Cantonese and function much the same as they do in English. Here Chan Git-ming uses it to confirm something about which he is not sure (eating snails in France).

  32. Tèngyàhngóng

    Literally, '[I] have heard people say,' or more naturally, '[I] have heard.'

  33. bo

    Particle indicating exclamation, special consideration, or appreciation. Here *bo* solicits agreement from Chan Git-ming about whether or not Cantonese like to eat snake.

  34. hòi

    Literally 'to open,' *hòi* is also used to mean 'begin,' 'initiate,' 'set forth,' etc.

  35. Perfect aspect particle indicating that an event is viewed as complete. Note that although perfect aspect often is set in the past, it is not the same as the past tense, which is not directly correlated with real time.

  36. gàa

    Classifier for restaurant.

  37. góbihn

    Literally 'that side,' *góbihn* means 'there' in this sentence. *Gó-* 'that' is a bound form (it does not occur by itself) and typically precedes a classifier.

  38. dākhaahn

    Means 'to have free time.'

  39. Conventions and Grammatical Terms

  40. Particles

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Cantonese: Word View, click below to listen
Lesson 4: Hái Pàhngyáuh Ūkkéi Sihkfaahn


(Lòh Ōn-nèih heui Chàhn Giht-mìhng ūkkéi sihkfaahn.) Play Video


Lòh Ōn-nèih: (Paakmùhn) Chàhn Sìnsàang háidouh ma?
Chàhn Taaitáai: (Hòimùhn) Háidouh, yahplèih !
Chàhn Gihtmìhng: Néih hóu! Yíh, Làhm Síujé m̀hlèih a? Faahn choi dōu jéunbeihhóu lo, jauh dánggán néihdeih jàh.
Lòh : M̀hhóu yisī, Làhm Yèuhngjí yáuhdī sih m̀hlèihdāk.
Chàhn G.: Jàn haih hó sīk! Ngóh taaitáai hóu séung yìhngsīk kéuih. Gám, hahchi sìn ne.
Lòh: Ngóh daaijódī tòhng béi néihdeih.
Chàhn G.: M̀hsái gam haakhei!

(Kéuihdeih jéunbeih chóhdài sihkfaahn.)

Lòh: M̀hhóu yisī, màhfàahnsaai.
Chàhn G: M̀hgányiu, chéng chóh !
Chàhn T: Bihnfaahn , móuh māt màhfàahn, chéng chóh . *
Lòh: Mèihdouh hóu hèung a! Chàhn Táai, haih néih jyú ga?
Chàhn: Màhpòh dauhfuh haih ngóh sìnsàang jyúge, kèihtàdī dōu haih ngóh jyúge.
Lòh: Néihdeih jùngyi mātyéh Jùnggwok choi a?
Chàhn: Ngóh jùngyi chyùnchoi. Ōn-nèih, néih sīk m̀hsīk jyúfaahn a?
Lòh: M̀hhaih géi sīk. Daahnhaih Làhm Yèuhngjí hóu sīk jíng yùhsàang.
Chàhn T: Mātyéh lèihga, yùhsaàng sihkdāk gàh?
Lòh: Sihkdākge, hóu hóusihk tìm.
Chàhn G: Faatgwokyàhn juhng sihk tìhnlóyuhk tìm! Ōn-Nèih, haihm̀hhaih a?
Lòh: Haih ā. Tèngyàhngóng, Gwóngdùngyàhn jùngyi sihk sèh bo.
Chàhn G: Ngóhdeih fuhgahn hòijó yātgàan chàangún, góbihnge sèh hóu hóusihkge.
Lòh: Jàn'ge? Ngóh dākhaahn heui sihah sìn.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson shown with Chinese Characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Food Terms: Romanized / Chinese ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

Cantonese: Sentence View, click below to listen
Lesson 4: Hái Pàhngyáuh Ūkkéi Sihkfaahn


(Lòh Ōn-nèih heui Chàhn Giht-mìhng ūkkéi sihkfaahn.) Play Video


Lòh Ōn-nèih: (Paakmùhn) Chàhn Sìnsàang háidouh ma?
Chàhn Taaitáai: (Hòimùhn) Háidouh, yahplèih lā!
Chàhn Gihtmìhng: Néih hóu! Yíh, Làhm Síujé m̀hlèih a? Faahn choi dōu jéunbeihhóu lo, jauh dánggán néihdeih jàh.
Lòh : M̀hhóu yisī, Làhm Yèuhngjí yáuhdī sih m̀hlèihdāk.
Chàhn G.: Jàn haih hó sīk! Ngóh taaitáai hóu séung yìhngsīk kéuih. Gám, hahchi sìn ne.
Lòh: Ngóh daaijódī tòhng béi néihdeih.
Chàhn G.: M̀hsái gam haakhei!

(Kéuihdeih jéunbeih chóhdài sihkfaahn.)

Lòh: M̀hhóu yisī, màhfàahnsaai.
Chàhn G: M̀hgányiu, chéng chóh lā!
Chàhn T: Bihnfaahn jè, móuh māt màhfàahn, chéng chóh lā. *
Lòh: Mèihdouh hóu hèung a! Chàhn Táai, haih néih jyú ga?
Chàhn: Màhpòh dauhfuh haih ngóh sìnsàang jyúge, kèihtàdī dōu haih ngóh jyúge.
Lòh: Néihdeih jùngyi mātyéh Jùnggwok choi a?
Chàhn: Ngóh jùngyi chyùnchoi. Ōn-nèih, néih sīk m̀hsīk jyúfaahn a?
Lòh: M̀hhaih géi sīk. Daahnhaih Làhm Yèuhngjí hóu sīk jíng yùhsàang.
Chàhn T: Mātyéh lèihga, yùhsaàng sihkdāk gàh?
Lòh: Sihkdākge, hóu hóusihk tìm.
Chàhn G: Faatgwokyàhn juhng sihk tìhnlóyuhk tìm! Ōn-Nèih, haihm̀hhaih a?
Lòh: Haih ā. Tèngyàhngóng, Gwóngdùngyàhn jùngyi sihk sèh bo.
Chàhn G: Ngóhdeih fuhgahn hòijó yātgàan chàangún, góbihnge sèh hóu hóusihkge.
Lòh: Jàn'ge? Ngóh dākhaahn heui sihah sìn.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson shown with Chinese Characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Food Terms: Romanized / Chinese ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
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Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Word View, click below to listen
Lesson 4: Hái Pàhngyáuh Ūkkéi Sihkfaahn


(Lòh Ōn-nèih heui Chàhn Giht-mìhng ūkkéi sihkfaahn.) Play Video


Lòh Ōn-nèih: (Paakmùhn) Chàhn Sìnsàang háidouh ma?
Chàhn Taaitáai: (Hòimùhn) Háidouh, yahplèih !
Chàhn Gihtmìhng: Néih hóu! Yíh, Làhm Síujé m̀hlèih a? Faahn choi dōu jéunbeihhóu lo, jauh dánggán néihdeih jàh.
Lòh : M̀hhóu yisī, Làhm Yèuhngjí yáuhdī sih m̀hlèihdāk.
Chàhn G.: Jàn haih hó sīk! Ngóh taaitáai hóu séung yìhngsīk kéuih. Gám, hahchi sìn ne.
Lòh: Ngóh daaijódī tòhng béi néihdeih.
Chàhn G.: M̀hsái gam haakhei!

(Kéuihdeih jéunbeih chóhdài sihkfaahn.)

Lòh: M̀hhóu yisī, màhfàahnsaai.
Chàhn G: M̀hgányiu, chéng chóh !
Chàhn T: Bihnfaahn , móuh māt màhfàahn, chéng chóh . *
Lòh: Mèihdouh hóu hèung a! Chàhn Táai, haih néih jyú ga?
Chàhn: Màhpòh dauhfuh haih ngóh sìnsàang jyúge, kèihtàdī dōu haih ngóh jyúge.
Lòh: Néihdeih jùngyi mātyéh Jùnggwok choi a?
Chàhn: Ngóh jùngyi chyùnchoi. Ōn-nèih, néih sīk m̀hsīk jyúfaahn a?
Lòh: M̀hhaih géi sīk. Daahnhaih Làhm Yèuhngjí hóu sīk jíng yùhsàang.
Chàhn T: Mātyéh lèihga, yùhsaàng sihkdāk gàh?
Lòh: Sihkdākge, hóu hóusihk tìm.
Chàhn G: Faatgwokyàhn juhng sihk tìhnlóyuhk tìm! Ōn-Nèih, haihm̀hhaih a?
Lòh: Haih ā. Tèngyàhngóng, Gwóngdùngyàhn jùngyi sihk sèh bo.
Chàhn G: Ngóhdeih fuhgahn hòijó yātgàan chàangún, góbihnge sèh hóu hóusihkge.
Lòh: Jàn'ge? Ngóh dākhaahn heui sihah sìn.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson shown with Chinese Characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Food Terms: Romanized / Chinese ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com

American English: Sentence View, click below to listen
Lesson 4: Hái Pàhngyáuh Ūkkéi Sihkfaahn


(Lòh Ōn-nèih heui Chàhn Giht-mìhng ūkkéi sihkfaahn.) Play Video


Lòh Ōn-nèih: (Paakmùhn) Chàhn Sìnsàang háidouh ma?
Chàhn Taaitáai: (Hòimùhn) Háidouh, yahplèih lā!
Chàhn Gihtmìhng: Néih hóu! Yíh, Làhm Síujé m̀hlèih a? Faahn choi dōu jéunbeihhóu lo, jauh dánggán néihdeih jàh.
Lòh : M̀hhóu yisī, Làhm Yèuhngjí yáuhdī sih m̀hlèihdāk.
Chàhn G.: Jàn haih hó sīk! Ngóh taaitáai hóu séung yìhngsīk kéuih. Gám, hahchi sìn ne.
Lòh: Ngóh daaijódī tòhng béi néihdeih.
Chàhn G.: M̀hsái gam haakhei!

(Kéuihdeih jéunbeih chóhdài sihkfaahn.)

Lòh: M̀hhóu yisī, màhfàahnsaai.
Chàhn G: M̀hgányiu, chéng chóh lā!
Chàhn T: Bihnfaahn jè, móuh māt màhfàahn, chéng chóh lā. *
Lòh: Mèihdouh hóu hèung a! Chàhn Táai, haih néih jyú ga?
Chàhn: Màhpòh dauhfuh haih ngóh sìnsàang jyúge, kèihtàdī dōu haih ngóh jyúge.
Lòh: Néihdeih jùngyi mātyéh Jùnggwok choi a?
Chàhn: Ngóh jùngyi chyùnchoi. Ōn-nèih, néih sīk m̀hsīk jyúfaahn a?
Lòh: M̀hhaih géi sīk. Daahnhaih Làhm Yèuhngjí hóu sīk jíng yùhsàang.
Chàhn T: Mātyéh lèihga, yùhsaàng sihkdāk gàh?
Lòh: Sihkdākge, hóu hóusihk tìm.
Chàhn G: Faatgwokyàhn juhng sihk tìhnlóyuhk tìm! Ōn-Nèih, haihm̀hhaih a?
Lòh: Haih ā. Tèngyàhngóng, Gwóngdùngyàhn jùngyi sihk sèh bo.
Chàhn G: Ngóhdeih fuhgahn hòijó yātgàan chàangún, góbihnge sèh hóu hóusihkge.
Lòh: Jàn'ge? Ngóh dākhaahn heui sihah sìn.

____________Additional Notes____________
This lesson shown with Chinese Characters
[Conventions and Grammatical Terms | Particles | Food Terms: Romanized / Chinese ]


We welcome your feedback on these lessons. If you would like to use exercises for each lesson such as Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blank, and Listening Dictation that keep track of your score and progress ad-free, subscribe to this course today!
Follow us on: Facebook Twitter

Copyright 1995-2017 Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. Used under license, see https://languagecanvas.com